Wilson Museum to Highlight “Images of Social Justice”

A new exhibition at Hollins University’s Eleanor D. Wilson Museum is shining the spotlight on concerns related to race, gender, citizenship, culture wars, and the abuse of power.

Images of Social Justice from the Segura Arts Studio, which is on display at the Wilson Museum from September 13 through December 9, features 37 prints created by 17 visiting artists who in their own style tackle either human, animal, or land rights issues.

Joe Segura, who has dedicated his life’s work to working with and promoting artists from underrepresented cultural groups, founded the Segura Publishing Company in 1981 in Tempe, Arizona. He was drawn to marginalized artists: women, African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans. In 2013, the University of Notre Dame invited him to move his workshop to South Bend, Indiana. Under a new name, Segura Arts Studio, the master printer and publisher dovetailed the studio’s activities with those of academic departments at Notre Dame. He launched a program called “Social Justice in the Visual Arts” that engages incoming students in print workshop activities, including the opportunity to learn collaborative process and meet visiting artists.

Most of the prints in the Wilson Museum exhibition have been created since the move to Indiana. These include:

  • A black and white lino-cut by Elizabeth Catlett titled Mimi
  • Sue Coe’s lithography titled La Frontera
  • Luis Jiminez’s lithograph titled Entre la Puta y Muerta
  • Mixed media works that pair image and text by Luis Gonzales Palma
  • Black and white photogravures by Graciela Dicochea

The first artist to visit the new space in 2013 was Claudia Bernardi. Earlier that year, the International Committee of the Red Cross asked her to conduct and facilitate a collaborative community-based project with youth affected by violence. Later, she was invited to Segura Arts Studio to create a suite of prints. The series, Palabras de Arena/Words of Sand, was inspired by stories she heard and observations she made while working with these children and their community.

Bernardi will discuss how her human rights work informs her creative art work on Wednesday, September 26, at 6 p.m. in the Richard Wetherill Visual Arts Center Auditorium. An opening reception for Images of Social Justice from the Segura Arts Studio will follow.

The Eleanor D. Wilson Museum at Hollins University is open Tuesday – Sunday, noon – 5 p.m., and Thursdays, noon – 8 p.m. Admission is always free.

 

Photo caption: Claudia Bernardi, one of the artists whose work is featured in Images of Social Justice, speaks at the Wilson Museum on September 26.

 


Hollins, Roanoke College Announce Perry F. Kendig Award Nominees

Artists, arts advocates, and arts and cultural organizations are among the nominees for the 2018 Perry F. Kendig Arts and Culture Awards.

Co-sponsored by Hollins University and Roanoke College, the Kendig Awards program recognizes exemplary individuals, businesses, and organizations in the Roanoke Valley that support excellence in the arts.

This year’s winners will be announced at Hollins University’s Wyndham Robertson Library on Wednesday, Sept. 12, at 5:30 p.m.

Here are the nominees for the 2018 Kendig Awards:

  • Nancy Agee
    Agee is the president and CEO of Carilion Clinic and president of the American Hospital Association. She has supported artists, performers and educators in the Roanoke Valley for more than 30 years.
  • Artemis, Artists & Writers, Inc.
    A publisher of literary and art journals, and host of local exhibitions and events for 40 years, Artemis has showcased literary and visual artists from Southwest Virginia and beyond. Recent publications have introduced the culture of the Roanoke Valley to Europe, Australia and Asia, and their free workshops, internships and festivals have inspired creativity and fellowship for all ages and all levels of experience.
  • Rita Bishop
    As the superintendent for Roanoke City Public Schools (RCPS), Bishop has fostered partnerships with Roanoke Symphony Orchestra, Opera Roanoke, the Jefferson Center, Southwest Virginia Ballet and others. Through her leadership, advocacy and service, leaders from the VH1 Save the Music Foundation have supported RCPS programs with hundreds of thousands of dollars.
  •  Dotsy Clifton
    For more than four decades, Clifton has supported many of the region’s arts organizations. As a volunteer, she has served on the board of directors of The Roanoke Women’s Foundation, The Grandin Theatre, Center in the Square and Mill Mountain Theatre, where she was board chair. Clifton has been praised as a true conduit, realizing that the arts and history of this region humanize and connect its citizens in many ways.
  • Doug Jackson
    Jackson first became involved in Roanoke’s arts and cultural scene with the Roanoke Arts Commission. He played a key role in developing the city’s first Arts and Cultural Plan as well as Book City Roanoke, and has volunteered for Roanoke Valley Reads and CityWorks (X)po. He is also a published author who has won the James Andrew Purdy Prize for Fiction and the Artisan Center of Virginia’s Award for Excellence.
  • Jefferson Center
    A premier performance venue, educational hub, and center for community life, the Jefferson Center’s mission is to provide broad access to inspirational performing arts, transformative arts education, and vibrant community space. Its Music Lab program, which offers music education to students of all ages, is a nationally recognized model for arts education beyond the classroom. The Jefferson Center also is home to more than 15 regional nonprofits and small businesses.
  • Cynthia and Mark Lawrence
    The Lawrences have connected arts organizations with business and have helped both succeed on projects that yield community-wide benefits. Their participation in organizations such as Mill Mountain Theatre, Roanoke Symphony Orchestra, and the Taubman Museum of Art have positively impacted the culture of the Roanoke Valley and brought together countless artists and other influential Roanokers.
  • Amanda Mansfield
    Mansfield has made a major impact on the Roanoke theater scene for more than 12 years. She has performed for numerous production companies in the area, and has led successful program development and fundraising efforts for Roanoke Children’s Theatre, Center in the Square and Mill Mountain Theatre. She was responsible for significant increases in the annual operating budgets for all three organizations.
  • Maury Strauss
    Strauss’s support of and dedication to arts and culture in Roanoke spans a broad spectrum, including the Taubman Museum of Art, The Jefferson Center, Roanoke Children’s Theatre (which he helped establish), Opera Roanoke, Temple Emanuel, Mill Mountain Theatre, Virginia Western Community College and many other organizations. Through Strauss’s generosity, the Taubman has created the Sheila and Maury L. Strauss Art Venture Endowment.
  • Margaret Sue Turner Wright
    Having curated a dozen art shows and establishing organizations such as Plein Air Roanoke and 202 Figurative Group, Wright has welcomed hundreds of artists, patrons, and enthusiasts to Roanoke. Locally, she has donated many of her paintings to auctions that have raised several thousand dollars for hospitals and arts institutions. She has also donated paintings for charity fundraising events around the country, including Back to the Roots, hosted by Shriners Hospitals for Children.

Named for the late Perry F. Kendig, who served as president of Roanoke College and was an avid supporter and patron of the arts, the Kendig Awards were established in 1985 and presented annually by the Arts Council of the Blue Ridge through 2012. Hollins University and Roanoke College first partnered the following year to bestow the honors, and congratulate the 2018 slate of distinguished nominees.

For more information about the Kendig Awards, visit https://kendig.press.hollins.edu/.


Save Money, Find the Right Fit: Visit Hollins During Va. Private College Week

Hollins University is among 24 colleges and universities across the commonwealth that will be highlighting the quality and affordability of private higher education during Virginia Private College Week (VPCW), July 23 – 28. The event is sponsored by the Council of Independent Colleges in Virginia (CICV).

Hollins will offer campus tours and information sessions about admissions, financial aid, and academic programs, and will also address some common myths about the cost of a private college education. “Visiting campuses in person is one of the most important steps in the college search process,” said CICV President Robert Lambeth. “I encourage parents to explore which college will be the best fit for their son or daughter, and I want to assure them that a quality education at a Virginia private college is affordable and within reach.”

Students who visit at least three institutions during the week will receive three application fee waivers. Students may use these waivers to apply to any three participating CICV colleges for free. In addition, students visiting at least three institutions will also be eligible for a drawing for a $500 Amazon gift card.

Sessions at Hollins and most other participating colleges will begin at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m., Monday through Friday, and at 9 a.m. on Saturday. To sign up for a session at Hollins, go to our VPCW registration page.  For more information about CICV and VPCW, visit the Virginia Private Colleges website.


Student, Faculty Performers Take Center Stage at Spring Dance Works

A Hollins tradition continues as the university celebrates creativity and artistry in movement at the 2018 Spring Dance Works, which will be held Friday and Saturday, May 4 and 5, at 8 p.m. each evening in the Hollins Theatre. Admission is free.

The two-night event represents the culmination of studio practice efforts, scholarly research, and creative choreographic/performance compositions of students and faculty in the dance program. This year’s program also features a special performance by the Shenandoah Contemporary Dance Theatre.

At Hollins, dance majors learn to think of dance as a dynamic form, full of possibilities for growth and innovation. Members of the dance community are encouraged to discover, refine, and celebrate who they are as artists. The program offers outstanding technique classes and an international visiting-artist roster. Opportunities to perform and craft are abundant.

 


Senior Thesis, Film Short Screenings Showcase Student Filmmakers

Over the past four years, senior film majors at Hollins have honed their craft through a variety of hands-on, on-campus opportunities. These students will conclude their undergraduate careers by screening their senior thesis films and screenplays on Wednesday and Thursday, May 2 and 3, from 7 – 8 p.m. in the Wetherill Visual Arts Center’s Niederer Auditorium.

“We teach a comprehensive curriculum for film studies and for film/video production. Other schools don’t always invest in all these disciplines under one roof,” explains Amy Gerber-Stroh, associate professor of film and chair of the Hollins film department. “Very few schools in the nation offer an undergraduate all-woman film program, particularly a program that includes film/video production.”

This year’s senior thesis screenings include:

Wednesday, May 2

Honey Bear’s Big Adventure by Rachel Harris (animation)
A young bear fails at her attempts to talk to a cute bunny who brings the mail every day. It’s not until Honey Bear saves the world that she can summon the courage to ask Bunny-Boo out.

Homeless in Bolivia by Annalise Kiser (documentary)
Shalom, an organization in Bolivia, takes in homeless and neglected children. This film reflects on stories about dedicated volunteers and the children who seek refuge.

Dust Buddies by Allison Moore (scene reading of screenplay pilot)
Maxa Thousand is an anthropomorphic armadillo who enjoys solitude in the Grand Stretch until he meets AcroBat, a girl bat who is trapped at a circus and begs Maxa to break her out.

In These Woods by Nia Orellana (narrative)
Kevin, a young cryptid, is ready to explore the human world, finding allies to help him and those who would like nothing better than to see him dead.

Conspiracy by Seph Reid (scene readings of feature screenplay)
On the anniversary of his sister’s death, an old friend shows up at Mark’s workplace with a shocking secret.

Thursday, May 3

The Souls Within by James Stewart (scene readings of feature screenplay)
Sarah is a new kid in school who is miserable until she meets a boy named Zim. When they discover a strange book in the library, their lives change forever.

Frankie & June by Leiana Valenzuela (narrative)
Amidst a surreal landscape of Los Angeles, flighty June must overcome her fear of love in order to accept herself and her feelings for her best friend Frankie.

Appetite by Delaney Walker (animation)
A boy named Johnny accepts a job as a groundskeeper’s apprentice. All he has to do is assist in routine trimmings, yard work, and orange harvesting. How bad could it be?

We Are Here to Stay by Sydney Williams (documentary)
A film that explores the meaning of transgender and the reasons why transmen students choose to attend single-gendered institutions.

 

In addition, the Hollins film department will present film shorts made by the Spring Term 2018 film production classes on Friday, May 11, from 7 – 8:30 p.m.

Admission to all three screenings is free and open to the public.

 


Hollins Theatre Brings Back the “Razzle Dazzle” with “Chicago” Revival

After nine years, Hollins Theatre is returning to the scene of the crime with a revival of one of Broadway’s most celebrated musicals.

Hollins University’s theatre department is presenting a new production of the Tony Award-winning hit Chicago, April 12 – 15 and April 18 – 21. Tickets are $10 general admission, with one free ticket available to current Hollins students, faculty, and staff.

Director Ernie Zulia, Hollins Theatre’s artistic director and chair, believes Chicago’s tale of murder, greed, corruption, treachery, and show biz during the Roaring Twenties is more relevant to audiences than ever before. “Aside from being fantastic entertainment, the show has an even stronger resonance now because it shines such a powerful spotlight on manipulation of the media, fake news, spin, alternative facts, and a public that is hungry for the truth,” he explains. “Not that we are seeing any of that in the world today!”

Chicago also boasts strong connections to southwest Virginia. Two current Hollins students who are also residents of Roanoke play featured roles: senior Emma Sala portrays Velma Kelly, and Anna Holland, a junior, is cast as Roxie Hart. In addition, guest artist Kendall Payne, who plays Billy Flynn, is a professional actor originally from Pulaski. He is the nephew of local jazz legend William Penn.

Zulia says the show is a tribute to John Sailer, who was Hollins Theatre’s resident scenery and lighting designer for ten years and passed away suddenly in 2015.

“We have recreated his original design for Chicago, which was one of his best ever,” Zulia notes.

Featuring such hit songs as “All That Jazz” and “Razzle Dazzle,” Chicago is based on the play by Maurine Dallas Watkins. The show is not recommended for children.

For tickets and show times, visit hollins.edu/theatre or call (540) 362-6517.


Hollins Partners with Rise Against Hunger to Support International Hunger Relief

Hollins is joining the global movement to end world hunger by 2030.

The Office of Spiritual and Religious Life and Meriwether Godsey, the university’s dining services provider, are combining forces with the international relief organization Rise Against Hunger to host a series of special events to raise funds, package meals, and spread the word about achieving the realistic goal of a world without hunger over the next 22 years.

Activities will begin with Hollins’ annual Golden Rule Dinner on Tuesday, March 13, from 5 – 7 p.m. in Moody Dining Hall. “For many years, this simple meal of soup and bread has raised awareness of our neighbors who struggle with food insecurity,” said University Chaplain Jenny Call. “As many religions and spiritual traditions have a version of the ‘golden rule,’ an injunction to ‘do unto others as you would have them to do unto you,’ we show compassion for those who are hungry and work toward hunger relief.”

Through the Golden Rule Dinner, Meriwether Godsey will make a donation to Rise Against Hunger based on the meal savings and the amount of people participating through meal card swipes or dinner purchases.

Also on March 13, Rise Against Hunger Chief Development Officer Peggy Shriver will discuss issues of women, poverty, and hunger relief beginning at 5:30 p.m. in Moody Student Center’s Goodwin Private Dining Room. “Attendees are invited to bring their dinner and listen and learn as they eat,” said Call.

Rise Against Hunger will offer Hollins students, faculty, and staff the opportunity to take part in hands-on service on Tuesday and Wednesday, March 13 and 14, in Moody Student Center’s Ballator Gallery. “They will guide us in packing and sealing bags of rice, soybeans, and vitamins that will provide the required daily nutrients to a family of four,” Call explained. “Hollins’ goal is to fund and pack 30,000 meals over these two days. Classes, groups, and individuals are invited to come and go as they are able throughout the scheduled hours (8 a.m. – 8 p.m. on Tuesday, 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. on Wednesday) to help with the packing.”

The Darci Ellis Godhard Fund for Social Justice is partially funding the lecture and meal packaging events. Additional monetary donations and registration for the meal packaging events can be made online:

Tuesday, March 13

Wednesday, March 14 

 

 


Pareena Lawrence Inaugurated as Hollins University’s 12th President

Proclaiming that the “search for authentic purpose is ultimately what a Hollins education is all about and why I wanted to be a part of this mission,” Pareena G. Lawrence was officially installed as Hollins University’s 12th president on February 24.

“Since I arrived at Hollins, I have witnessed first-hand our unwavering dedication to making society a better place for all,” said Lawrence, who took office last July. “I have seen the ways in which we are intentionally developing and equipping future leaders, creators, policymakers, and citizens who understand their social responsibility and serve the communities in which they live.”

Lawrence’s inauguration celebrated the theme, “Living a Life of Consequence: Hollins Students Changing the World.” It encompassed a full day of events beginning with a panel discussion featuring Hollins alumnae who are making an impact in the sciences, law, community partnerships overseas, and the arts.

The inaugural ceremony, held in duPont Chapel, featured contributions from Hollins students, faculty, staff, and alumnae, along with dignitaries from local government, international business, and higher education:

  • The Reverend Dr. Cynthia Hale ’75, founder and senior pastor of Georgia’s Ray of Hope Christian Church, delivered the invocation.
  • Official greetings were presented by Student Government Association President Antonia Nagle ’18; Associate Professor of History and Faculty Chair Rachel Nuñez; Groundskeeper Isaiah Sweetenberg; Hollins Alumnae Association Board of Directors President Sarah Holland ’64; and Roanoke Mayor Sherman P. Lea Sr.
  • Indra K. Nooyi, chairman and chief executive of PepsiCo, was the keynote speaker. In addition to leading PepsiCo’s global food and beverage portfolio including 22 brands, Nooyi is the chief architect of Performance with Purpose, PepsiCo’s commitment to delivering sustained growth with a focus on making healthier products, protecting the planet, and empowering people.
  • Paula L. O’Loughlin, provost and dean of the faculty at Coe College, shared stories from her years-long friendship with Lawrence and her family.

In her inaugural address, Lawrence reflected upon her training as an economist and admitted that her discipline’s preference for “equations, statistics, and numbers” and aversion to “the questions of spirit and soul” were misguided.

“We were late to the realization that we don’t move the demand curve by moving the supply curve,” she explained. “We move the demand curve by moving the hearts and minds, the dreams and aspirations, of the people around us.”

Lawrence praised Hollins and other institutions that are grounded in the liberal arts for having “never lost sight of what is truly important. Together we have the responsibility to help challenge and educate our students so that they can understand their role in our larger society and become drivers of positive change within their sphere of influence.”

Lawrence concluded by reminding the audience, “We are called to a different sort of life, a life of noisy exuberance, a life of joy and a life of consequence, and life worth celebrating not because of financial success but because we can make a difference.

“I want you to join me to build the Hollins of tomorrow so that we can continue the noble purpose of educating women who lead lives of consequence.”

Prior to the inaugural ceremony, members of the class of 2018 placed a wreath on Front Quad to honor all who worked to establish Hollins in its early years.

“Today is not only the presidential inauguration but also the day that commemorates our founders,” Lawrence stated. She acknowledged Charles Lewis Cocke, whose 55 years of leadership ensured the institution’s survival, and the men and women of what was once known as the Oldfields Community, “some of whom worked as enslaved people until the end of the Civil War in 1865, built and maintained our campus facilities, and took care of Hollins students and faculty during her early days. Most did not choose this work of their own volition and their contributions remained unrecognized for far too long.” Lawrence welcomed the ceremony attendees who “descended from those who provided foundational contributions to our campus in her infancy.”

Another inauguration highlight was the awarding of an honorary degree to Elizabeth Hall McDonnell ’62. “With an enduring quality of quiet yet effective leadership and service, you have made an indelible impression on your alma mater and so many other educational and cultural institutions,” her citation read, noting “her extraordinary generosity in support of such initiatives as the restoration of the Hollins Theatre physical space, growing the theatre and playwriting programs, and renovating the Dana Science Building.”

 

View the inauguration ceremony in its entirety here

 


National Gallery Highlights Hollins Alumna, Acclaimed Photographer in “Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings”

Sally Mann ’74, M.A. ’75 is one of America’s most celebrated photographers, and the National Gallery of Art is presenting the first major international exhibition of her photographs of the South.

Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings brings together 115 photographs that offer insight into Mann’s connection with the literature, art, and history of her native region. Many of the photographs in the exhibition, which will be on view in the National Gallery of Art’s West Building in Washington, D.C., from March 4 through May 28, are being shown for the first time.

“In her compelling photographs, Mann uses the personal to allude to the universal, considering intimate questions of family, memory, and death while also evoking larger concerns about the influence of the South’s past on its present,” said National Gallery of Art Director Earl A. Powell, III.

A Thousand Crossings is a five-part exhibition. Family features photographs that Mann took of her three children during the 1980s at their summer cabin on Virginia’s Maury River. Swamplands, fields, and decaying estates that Mann discovered during her travels across Virginia, Georgia, Louisiana, and Mississippi in the 1990s highlight The Land.  Civil War battlefields are the focus of Last Measure, and Abide with Me investigates the role of race and history in shaping Virginia’s landscape and Mann’s own childhood and adolescence. The exhibition’s final section, What Remains, touches on themes of time, transformation, and death through photographs of Mann and her family.

“With the acquisition of works from the Corcoran Gallery of Art in 2014, the National Gallery is now one of the largest repositories of Mann’s photographs,” Powell noted. “We are grateful for the opportunity to work closely with the artist in presenting a wide selection of the work she has created over four decades.”

Mann has won numerous awards, including fellowships from the Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Arts. In 2001 she was named America’s Best Photographer by Time magazine. Her books of photographs include Immediate Family, At Twelve, and Mother Land. Her photographs are in the permanent collections of many museums, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum. In 2015, her memoir, Hold Still, was shortlisted for the National Book Award. She is a recipient of the Hollins Distinguished Alumnae Award.

 

Photo Credit: Betsy Schneider


Hollins, Carilion Clinic, Turn the Page Partner to Promote Early Literacy

 

For Carilion Children’s youngest patients, this Thanksgiving came with a special treat – a newly republished Margaret Wise Brown book, and a pair of accomplished leaders (and moms) to read it to them.

Hollins President Pareena Lawrence and Carilion Clinic President and CEO Nancy Howell Agee spent their Thanksgiving morning reading to patients at Carilion Children’s. In addition to reading Brown’s perennial favorites Goodnight Moon and The Runaway Bunny, the two leaders introduced the children to Four Fur Feet.

“We wanted to make this Thanksgiving just a little brighter for our patients and their families,” said Agee. “It’s difficult being in a hospital, and especially during a holiday. Brown’s books have been a comfort to children for many decades and our patients were pretty excited to hear Four Fur Feet.”

Thanks to a partnership between Carilion and the Roanoke-based non-profit Turn The Page, and another partnership between Turn The Page and Hollins, every child born at Carilion during the year will receive the book. Hollins, which is Brown’s alma mater, is the repository for hundreds of her manuscripts, and made the Four Fur Feet manuscript available to be published.

“We know that children who are read to early in life become better readers – better learners – as they grow,” said Lawrence. “I’m thrilled that our partners at Turn The Page have made it their mission to get books into the hands of the 3,000 babies born at Carilion every year.”

Turn The Page’s mission is to increase awareness of the benefits of reading with children from birth and to provide every child born in the Roanoke Valley with his or her own home library of books during the first three years of life.

“Reading aloud is a simple way for parents to help their children grow,” said Lauren Ellerman, founder and board member of Turn The Page. “The partnerships with Carilion and Hollins are helping us get great books like Brown’s into the hands of families in the region.”

Lawrence, Agee, and Turn The Page volunteers finished out the morning by visiting several units of the hospital, including labor and delivery, mother-baby, and southwest Virginia’s only Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, and handing out the book to interested families.