Hollins M.F.A. in Dance to Partner with The Forsythe Company, Frankfurt University of Music and Performing Arts

mfadanceBeginning in the summer of 2014, Hollins University’s master of fine arts (M.F.A.) program in dance will collaborate with one of the world’s leading dance companies and an internationally acclaimed German university of performing arts.

The M.F.A. program is partnering with renowned choreographer William Forsythe’s The Forsythe Company and the Frankfurt University of Music and Performing Arts, both located in Frankfurt, Germany, to expand its students’ ability to engage with an international community.

“This new collaboration continues our history of innovative programming in research, education, and professional influence,” said Jeffery Bullock, program director. “We are committed to integrating our program with professional dance centers and metropolitan locations around the world.”

Hollins’ graduate program in dance offers a Year Residency Track, which is intended for recent graduates with an eye on the professional world of dance; a Low Residency – Two Summer Track, designed for mid-career artists, teachers, and dance professionals who must study in a limited time frame that accommodates their employment/performance schedule; and a Low Residency – Three Summer Track that serves emerging artists, teachers, and dance professionals. Previously, a course of European study was available only to students in the Year Residency Track, and the new alliances will enable Hollins to expand this experience to all students: They will spend five weeks on the Hollins campus and three weeks in Frankfurt.

Christopher Roman, former principal dancer with The Forsythe Company, will serve as the European study coordinator and will curate the three-week dance study and experience. He is a winner of the Faust Theatre Prize, Germany’s highest theatre honor, and has been a soloist and principal with ballet companies in Seattle, Miami, Montreal, and Philadelphia.

Ingo Diehl, professor and director of the contemporary dance program at the Frankfurt University of Music and Performing Arts, will also work closely with the M.F.A. program.

“Using the resources of multiple institutions, our students and faculty are able to establish a unique community of committed artists and scholars who range in ages and experiences and are working to sustain their careers and deepen their relationship to dance,” Bullock said. “We are providing students with a wide range of opportunities and mentorships as well as exposure to other practitioners in the international dance field.”


Hollins Professor Infuses Medicine with Art at Virginia Tech Carilion Mini Medical

carilionJennifer Anderson, an assistant professor of art at Hollins University, is lending her expertise to a community outreach initiative sponsored by the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine: the institution’s first mini medical school.

The four-part event, “Anatomy for Artists and Other Curious Sorts,” is part of a series designed to engage area residents with the medical school by providing educational offerings “with a slight twist,” said Dr. David Trinkle, the school’s associate dean of community and culture and a Carilion Clinic physician, in a news release. “We won’t be tackling standard health topics in a standard way. With this first one, for example, we’ll be adding an artistic component. Participants who want to translate what they’re learning into art will be able to do so.

“The only prerequisites are a curious mind and a willing spirit.”

Anderson is the sole art professor taking part in the inaugural mini medical school and the only presenter not affiliated with the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute. She will discuss “The Human Form Through the History of Art” at the event’s second program on Tuesday, March 25. Artists from Hollins are participating in all four interactive sessions to provide mentorship in drawing.

“We want everyone to know we’re more than an isolated, self-contained school teaching future doctors,” Trinkle said. “We’re also here to serve this community.”


Hollins Celebrates Founder’s Day, ‘All-Steinway School’ Designation

foundersHollins University’s official recognition as an “All-Steinway School,” along with performances by Hollins students and faculty and a concert by an internationally acclaimed pianist, highlighted this year’s commemoration of Founder’s Day on February 20.

Founder’s Day celebrates the birth of Charles Lewis Cocke, who served as president of Hollins from 1846 until his death in 1901. Even though Cocke came to Hollins after its establishment in 1842, he is considered the school’s founder because the institution would not have survived without his leadership during financial crises, disease epidemics, the Civil War, and other challenges.

Each year, Founder’s Day begins with members of the senior class processing to the Cocke Family Cemetery, located on the southeast end of campus, and placing a wreath on Mr. Cocke’s grave. The senior class traditionally chooses a member of the campus community to accompany them to the cemetery, and the class of 2014 selected Associate Professor of English Julie Pfeiffer for the honor this year.

That afternoon, the annual Founder’s Day convocation in duPont Chapel showcased the musical talents of a number of Hollins students, including soloists Liz Valvano ’15 (bassoon), Birdie Trotter ’15 (flute), Jessica Newberne ’14 (piano), and Naomi Fukuda ’15 (piano), and the Hollins University Concert Choir.

Professor of Music Judith Cline delivered the Founder’s Day address and talked about Hollins’ ten-year initiative to meet the criteria of Steinway & Sons, the world’s foremost piano maker, to become an ”All-Steinway School.” The status reflects Hollins’ commitment to excellence by providing students, faculty, and guest artists with the best equipment possible for the study and performance of music. Worldwide, just over 160 conservatories, colleges and universities, and other schools of distinction have earned this designation.  Cline, a soprano, paid tribute to the founder of Steinway & Sons, Henry Steinway, with a rendition of Richard Strauss’s “Morgen!”

Associate Professor of English T.J. Anderson III also recognized Hollins’ All-Steinway designation at the convocation, performing his jazz poem, ”Prelude to a Kiss,” in dedication.

During her remarks, Hollins President Nancy Gray announced more celebratory news. The university is launching a new honors program in Fall 2014 that is fully endowed thanks to a $1 million gift from an anonymous donor. She also congratulated the Hollins student team that this month won the 15th annual statewide collegiate Wells Fargo Ethics Bowl. Tom Barron, chair of the Hollins Board of Trustees,  joined Gray in saluting the university’s physical plant staff with a citation recognizing their exceptional work to ensure the campus remained safe and accessible during the recent winter storm that brought 19 inches of snow to the Roanoke Valley.

Two individual members of the campus community were also honored at the convocation. Cline received the Herta Freitag Faculty Legacy Award, presented to a member of the faculty whose recent scholarly and creative accomplishments reflect the extraordinary academic standards set by Freitag, who served as professor of mathematics at Hollins from 1948 to 1971. The Roberta A. Stewart Service Award, granted each Founder’s Day to a Hollins employee who demonstrates long-term service, loyalty to the university, and deep caring for students and colleagues, was presented to Elise Roschen, assistant to the director at the Hollins Riding Center.

Founder’s Day activities concluded that evening with a special concert by pianist Alexander Schimpf, winner of the 2011 Cleveland International Piano Competition. Prior to his performance, Steinway & Sons representatives from New York City and Washington, D.C., officially presented the “All-Steinway School” plaque to Gray, Barron, and Cline (pictured above from left to right). Hollins  joins George Mason University, James Madison University, Radford University, and Episcopal High School in Alexandria as Virginia’s only “All-Steinway Schools.”

Founder’s Day has been commemorated at Hollins since 1898.


Pianist Alexander Schimpf Headlines All-Steinway Founder’s Day Celebration

schimpfA concert featuring German pianist Alexander Schimpf will highlight Hollins University’s official recognition of its “All-Steinway School” designation during Hollins’ annual Founder’s Day celebration on Thursday, February 20.

Schimpf, whom the German daily newspaper Westfälische Nachrichten described as “a charismatic musical artist…a sensitive interpreter with great artistic maturity,” will perform that evening at 7:30 p.m. in duPont Chapel.

With the delivery last summer of seven instruments designed by Steinway & Sons,  the company regarded as the world’s finest piano maker, Hollins  joined George Mason University, James Madison University, Radford University, and Episcopal High School in Alexandria as Virginia’s only “All-Steinway Schools.” Worldwide, just over 150 conservatories, colleges and universities, and other schools of distinction have earned this designation. At least 95 percent of an institution’s instruments must carry the Steinway brand and must be in good condition to qualify for the recognition.

Schimpf rose to prominence by winning a series of impressive competitions, including the 2008 German Music Competition (an achievement no pianist had earned for 14 years), the 2009 International Beethoven Competition in Vienna, and the 2011 Cleveland International Piano Competition, where his final round performance with the renowned Cleveland Orchestra was given a standing ovation and received the Audience Favorite Prize. He has appeared in recital in France, Italy, Austria, Switzerland, England, and South America, and made his debut performance at New York’s Carnegie Hall in December 2011. His engagements through 2013 featured appearances as a soloist with the St. Petersburg Marinsky Theatre Orchestra, the Junge Deutsche Philharmonie in Frankfurt, and the Dresden Philharmonic. He gave recital performances at the International Keyboard Festival in New York and the International Chopin Festival in Poland.

Each year, Hollins’ Founder’s Day event celebrates the birth of Charles Lewis Cocke, who served as president of Hollins from 1846 until his death in 1901. Even though Cocke came to Hollins after its establishment in 1842, he is considered the school’s founder because the institution would not have survived without his leadership during financial crises, disease epidemics, the Civil War, and other challenges.

This year’s program on February 20 begins with the Founder’s Day convocation at 4:30 p.m. in duPont Chapel. It will feature performances by the Hollins University Concert Choir, Chamber Singers, music faculty, and students with Steinway pianos. Associate Professor of English T. J. Anderson will present an original jazz poem written for the occasion and Professor of Music Judith Cline will deliver a brief address.


Hollins, Mill Mountain Theatre Host American College Theater Festival

PrintHollins University and Roanoke’s Mill Mountain Theatre will host 900 students and faculty from colleges and universities in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and southwest Virginia at the Region Four festival of the 46th annual Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KCACTF), February 4 – 8.

Individual participants and full-scale productions are eligible for awards in a number of disciplines recognizing excellence in the art and craft of theater. Individual awardees and representatives from selected productions will be brought to Washington, D.C., for an expense-paid trip to the national festival, April 14 – 19, at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

Productions invited to be showcased at the Region Four festival are presented by Appalachian State University, Asbury University, Auburn University – Montgomery, Clayton State University, Georgia Southwestern State University, Hollins, Morehead State University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, University of Mississippi, Savannah College of Art and Design, and Troy University. Ten invited productions were selected from 42 eligible productions from the region. Two additional productions earned slots after receiving recognition during the Short Play Awards at last year’s Region Four festival, including Hollins Theatre’s production of Decision Height by Meredith Dayna Levy ’12, M.F.A. ’15. The drama is the story of six women whose lives are changed when they become Women Air Force Service Pilots during World War II.

Three public performances of Decision Height will be staged on Mill Mountain Theatre’s Trinkle Stage: Friday and Saturday, January 24 – 25, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, January 26, at 2 p.m. Admission is $10. To purchase tickets or for more information, visit www.hollins.edu/theatre or call the Hollins Theatre box office at (540) 362-6313.

Launched in 1969, the KCACTF encourages and recognizes the finest and most diverse theatrical productions from colleges and universities nationwide. Through its regional and national festivals, the KCACTF celebrates the achievements of theater programs, individual students, and faculty of colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Eight regional festivals provide opportunities for colleges and universities to showcase their finest work to diverse audiences of theater students and faculty from their regions.

Since its establishment, KCACTF has reached millions of theatergoers and made important contributions to the professional development of countless college and university theater students nationwide.


Hollins University Theatre Wins Four National Awards at this Year’s Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival

PrintHollins Theatre has been recognized with national honors in production, direction, performance, and playwriting by the 46th Annual Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KCACTF), sponsored by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.

Hollins’ production of Decision Height by Meredith Dayna Levy, a 2012 graduate of the university who is now pursuing her Master of Fine Arts degree in the Playwright’s Lab at Hollins, earned four awards, including Outstanding Production of a New Work; Distinguished Director of a New Work (presented to Ernie Zulia, who chairs the Hollins University theatre department); Distinguished Achievement, Performance and Production Ensembles; and the Harold and Mimi Steinberg National Student Playwriting Award for Levy.

The awards recognize individuals from across the United States for their achievements during the eight KCACTF regional festivals that were held January 7 through March 1 of this year. Hollins and Roanoke’s Mill Mountain Theatre co-hosted the Region IV KCACTF in February.

The awards were officially presented during the closing ceremony of the KCACTF national festival on Saturday, April 19, at the Kennedy Center.

“We are thrilled to be recognized by the Kennedy Center as a university that is not only creating outstanding theatre productions, but providing the training that allows students to do outstanding work,” said Zulia.

Hollins Theatre has received 14 Kennedy Center awards in the past 14 months, including two playwriting awards presented to Laura King, a candidate for the Master of Fine Arts degree in playwriting at Hollins, at the Region IV KCACTF last month, and five national Kennedy Center awards given last year to Hollins’ production of Natasha Trethewey’s Bellocq’s Ophelia.

The KCACTF encourages and celebrates the finest and most diverse theatrical productions from colleges and universities nationwide. The eight regional festivals and national festival provide an opportunity for college and university theatre departments to present their work, especially new or student-written work, and to receive outside assessment. Since its establishment in 1969, KCACTF has reached millions of theatregoers and made important contributions to the professional development of countless college and university theatre students nationwide.

 


M.F.A. in Dance Student Wins AAUW Career Development Grant

lewisLeila Anglin Lewis, a student in Hollins University’s Master of Fine Arts program in dance, has been awarded a Career Development Grant by the American Association of University Women (AAUW).

AAUW presents Career Development Grants annually as a way to help empower women in furthering their careers.

“We’re so proud to continue this wonderful legacy and to salute this new class of fellows and grantees,” said Gloria Blackwell, AAUW vice president of fellowships, grants, and global programs. “They now join the ranks of Nobel Prize winners, celebrated authors, social entrepreneurs, and prominent scholars who have used AAUW funding to advance equality for women and girls.”

Lewis, who resides in Greensboro, North Carolina, is an arts administrator, dance artist, and community advocate. Her vision is to create a life-affirming community wholeness center that houses an arts ecosystem and a family centered birthing center. In addition to pursuing her M.F.A. in dance at Hollins, Lewis is studying to become a certified professional midwife.

Lewis will use her AAUW Career Development Grant to research a paper focusing on the contextualization of the movement-based works of literary artists Zora Neale Hurston and Ntozake Shange. The grant will also support work on her thesis, which will draw parallels between the history of Samba, a Brazilian music and dance form, and the phases of womanhood according to the womb.

AAUW is one of the world’s leading supporters of graduate women’s education, having awarded nearly $100 million in fellowships, grants, and awards to more than 12,000 women from more than 130 countries since 1888.


Art Professor Jennifer Anderson Launches Taubman Museum’s New Mural Wall Program

andersonAssociate Professor of Art Jennifer Anderson is inaugurating a new mural wall program at Roanoke’s Taubman Museum of Art with the creation of her work, Resolute Understandings of Fragile Things.

The piece will be on display May 31 – September 6 on the patio mural wall across from Norah’s Café in the museum and along Norfolk Avenue.

For the mural project, Anderson will hand cut intricate stencils that will be printed on the retaining wall outside Norah’s. Using elements around the museum as inspiration, the mural will present the tenacious relationship between the natural and man-made environment as the mural itself functions as a “wall paper” with a pattern similar to those found in the formal dining rooms of Victorian homes.

Anderson is collaborating with students from Hollins and Ferrum College, who will contribute their own elements to the mural and assist with its installation.

Jennifer D. Anderson: Resolute Understandings of Fragile Things will be created as part of the programming for the Taubman Museum of Art’s annual Sidewalk Art Show. Anderson and the students from Hollins and Ferrum will add the final elements to the mural on May 31, the day of the show.

The Taubman Museum of Art is located at 110 Salem Avenue, SE, in downtown Roanoke.


Hollins Theatre Honored for Producing Women Playwrights

ICWPHollins Theatre is one of 67 theatre companies from nine countries cited by the International Centre for Women Playwrights (ICWP) for producing the work of women playwrights.

The ICWP has presented Hollins its 50/50 Applause Award, which spotlights theatres that produce 50% or more women playwrights in their season of shows. Theatres in Afghanistan, Australia, Canada, England, France, Germany, Italy, and the United States are among the honorees for 2014.

The award continues Hollins Theatre’s impressive run of national and international recognition. Over the past 20 months, the program has received 14 awards from the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival, including honors in production, direction, performance, and playwriting for Decision Height. The drama was written by Meredith Dayna Levy, a 2012 graduate of the university who is now pursuing her Master of Fine Arts degree in the Playwright’s Lab at Hollins. Two playwriting awards were also presented this spring to Laura King, a candidate for the Master of Fine Arts degree in playwriting at Hollins, and five national Kennedy Center awards were given last year to Hollins’ production of Natasha Trethewey’s Bellocq’s Ophelia.

Founded in 1988, ICWP’s mission is to support women playwrights worldwide and bring attention to their work.


Film Written by M.F.A. Grad to be Broadcast Nationally

hopeSusie’s Hope, a movie written and produced by Dan A.R. Kelly M.F.A. ’14, will air on the UP television network August 3.

The film, directed by Jerry Rees (The Brave Little Toaster), stars Emmanuelle Vaugier (40 Days and 40 Nights), Burgess Jenkins (Remember the Titans), and Andrea Powell (Ender’s Game). It’s about the inspirational relationship between a pit bull attack survivor, Donna Lawrence, and Susie, an abused pit bull-mix puppy, who learn to heal and forgive together. The movie is based on the real-life story of Lawrence and a severely abused puppy left for dead that she found in a Greensboro, North Carolina, park.

With the help of the Guilford County Animal Shelter, Susie survived her near-death experience and was adopted by Lawrence. Susie’s ordeal eventually led to the passing of Susie’s Law, which allows stricter punishment for animal abusers in North Carolina.

Susie, who is this year’s Therapy Dog Finalist in the American Humane Association’s Hero Dog Awards, portrays herself in the film.

On August 12, Green Apple Entertainment will release Susie’s Hope on DVD nationwide. The film has been given the Dove Family Seal of Approval.

Kelly received his M.F.A. in screenwriting and film studies at Hollins’ commencement exercises in May. He is a member of the Writer’s Guild of America.