Hollins Introduces Online Graduate Program in Teaching and Learning

Hollins University is launching a new Master of Arts in Teaching and Learning (MATL), an online graduate program for licensed PreK-12 educators who wish to grow their teaching skills for the benefit of their students, their school, and their career.

The MATL is designed for teachers who want to learn more about the practice of teaching; acquire and develop new knowledge; develop curricula in collaborative teams; and assume leadership roles within a school and/or school system.

“Men and women admitted to the program will have the opportunity to work with accomplished faculty in the areas essential in today’s continually changing landscape of PreK-12 education: writing, inquiry, instructional design, assessment, leadership, technology, and contemporary issues in education,” said Lorraine Lange, director of the MATL as well as the Master of Arts in Teaching and the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies graduate programs at Hollins. “Faculty members encourage collaborative efforts and provide opportunities for students, experienced teachers themselves, to learn from one another.”

Students in the MATL program must complete seven core courses, including a graduate thesis, and three program electives for a total of 40 credit hours. All courses are taught online.

For more information, contact Lorraine Lange at (540) 362-6576 or langel@hollins.edu.


MFA Dance Alumna Is Named a 2018 USA Fellow

Dancer and choreographer Amara Tabor-Smith M.F.A. ’16 is one of 45 artists and collectives across nine creative disciplines announced as 2018 USA Fellows by United States Artists.

Recognized for their creative accomplishments, each fellow will receive an unrestricted $50,000 cash award, which they may use to support their ongoing artistic and professional development.

Tabor-Smith lives in Oakland, California, and serves as the artistic director of Deep Waters Dance Theater. She describes her work as “Afro Futurist Conjure Art,” and her dance-making practice utilizes Yoruba spiritual ritual to address issues of social and environmental justice, race, gender identity, and belonging. Her current project, House/Full of Blackwomen, is a multi site-specific dance theater work that addresses the displacement, well-being, and sex-trafficking of black women and girls in Oakland.

Tabor-Smith’s work has been performed in Brazil, the Republic of Congo, New York, and the San Francisco Bay Area, where her company is based. She is an artist-in-residence at Stanford University and is a member of the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley.

USA Fellowships are awarded to artists at all stages of their careers, and from every corner of the United States, through a rigorous nomination and panel selection process. Spread across all creative disciplines including Architecture & Design, Craft, Dance, Media, Music, Theater & Performance, Traditional Arts, Visual Art, and Writing, the fellows represent a broad cross-section of the best of American arts and letters.

“I could not be more thrilled with the 2018 USA Fellows, or with the tremendous artistic output, and potential, they represent,” said United States Artists President and CEO Deana Haggag. “They produce some of the most moving, incisive, and powerful artistic work in the country, and it is our privilege to honor them. Collectively, they are a reminder of the beauty produced by hardworking artists on a daily basis, too much of which is often overlooked.”

Founded in 2006 by the Ford, Rockefeller, Rasmuson, and Prudential Foundations, United States Artists is among the largest providers of unrestricted support to artists working and living in the U.S. To date, the organization has provided more than $22 million in the form of unrestricted $50,000 awards directly to more than 500 artists working in all disciplines and at every career stage.

 


Summer at Hollins Features Graduate Studies, Improvement Projects, Special Programs

The 2014-15 academic year at Hollins has ended, but that doesn’t mean there won’t be lots of activity at the university during the summer months.

On June 1, work commences on a range of campus improvement projects:

  • Renovations to Moody Student Center will create space for the Student Government Association and others and enable the Hollins Bookstore to move into the area presently occupied by the Private Dining Room.
  • Randolph Hall will be refurbished and reopened this fall as a residence.
  • The Center for Learning Excellence will move from its current location in East Building to the first floor of Wyndham Robertson Library.
  • The upper porch between West Building and Botetourt Hall will be repaired.
  • Concrete sealing of sidewalks will be done on Front Quad and behind East Building.
  • Landscaping will be completed in the Hill House area.

The 2015 edition of the Tinker Mountain Writers’ Workshop comes to campus June 7-12, and Hollins welcomes back the Women Working With Clay Symposium, June 8-11.

Summer Term at Hollins begins June 22 and continues through July 31, featuring graduate courses in children’s book writing and illustrating, children’s literature, dance, liberal studies, playwriting, and screenwriting and film studies.

Hollinsummer, this year featuring three camps for rising ninth through 12th grade girls, takes place July 19-25 and July 26-August 1.


Lorraine Lange to Lead Hollins’ Graduate Programs in Teaching and Liberal Studies

Lorraine S. Lange, who is retiring this June as superintendent of Roanoke County Public Schools, has been named director of Hollins University’s co-educational Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) program and Master of Arts in Liberal Studies (M.A.L.S.) program, effective July 1.

After beginning her career as a teacher in Roanoke in 1969, Lange went on to serve as assistant principal, principal, supervisor of language arts K-12, associate director of instruction, assistant superintendent of instruction, and deputy superintendent of instruction before she was named superintendent in 2006. Her distinguished contributions to K-12 education were recognized when she was named Virginia Superintendent of the Year in 2012. That same year, she was one of four finalists for National Superintendent of the Year.

“Dr. Lange has enjoyed an extraordinary career and we are delighted that she has agreed to helm our M.A.T. and M.A.L.S. programs,” said Patricia Hammer, vice president for academic affairs at Hollins. “Her knowledge and expertise will benefit our graduate students tremendously.”

Lange has first-hand experience in both the graduate programs she will be leading at Hollins. She completed her M.A.L.S. degree there in 1974 and later taught graduate-level education courses to aspiring teachers as an adjunct professor.

“I am thrilled to return to Hollins,” Lange said. “I am eager to guide students as they pursue their higher education goals.”

The M.A.T. program presents students who hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution the opportunity to earn teaching licensure and a graduate degree at the same time. It was the first program of its kind in the Roanoke Valley.

The M.A.L.S. program is intended for students with varied interests and backgrounds and features concentrations in humanities, social sciences, visual and performing arts, leadership, and interdisciplinary studies.