Hollins Announces Website Redesign

Hollins University has launched a redesign of its website, Hollins.edu, the most recent step in a continuing effort to better serve its community through the school’s growing digital platform.

Features include easy navigation, a refreshed look, and clean content to provide a user-friendly online experience. The site also boasts a new responsive design to accommodate the increasing amount of web traffic that comes from tablets and mobile devices.

“The redesigned website highlights Hollins’ standing as a prestigious liberal arts university,” said Hollins President Nancy Gray. “The intent is to showcase our close community and the strength of our student body and academic programs.”

Hollins produced the redesign in partnership with NewCity, a nationally recognized consulting, design, and development firm based in Blacksburg.

“Hollins’ approach should serve as a textbook to any school wanting to enhance its identity,” said Brian Maddox, creative director at NewCity. “The design sits comfortably where heritage meets contemporary, much like Hollins itself. They took the time to not only discover who they were speaking to as an institution, but also what voice they were using to do so.”

Gray added, “The redesign perfectly portrays our history and personality. It reflects our longstanding mission of preparing students for lives of active learning, fulfilling work, personal growth, achievement, and service to society.”


Forbes Ranks Hollins Among America’s 100 Most Financially Fit Colleges

financialHollins University has received an “A”  in the 2013 Forbes College Financial Grades, which the magazine says ”measure the fiscal soundness of more than 900 four-year, private, not-for-profit schools with more than 500 students.”

Forbes lists Hollins’ “financial GPA” as 4.013 out of maximum 4.5, which ranks 76th in the country and third in Virginia behind Washington and Lee University (ranked 10th nationally) and the University of Richmond (ranked 42nd).

“The grades measure financial fitness as determined by nine components broken into three categories,” Forbes says. The variables used to determine balance sheet and operational strength include:

  • Year-end endowment assets divided by the number of 12 month full-time equivalent students
  • How well a college’s “expendable assets” cover its annual expenses
  • The amount of expendable assets a college has relative to its debt load
  • How well a college meets its obligations (such as instructional expenses and students services) from the tuition, grants, gifts, and investment revenue it receives
  • How dependent a college is on tuition for core revenues
  • Whether a college’s assets are actually growing
  • The percentage of admitted students who actually choose to attend a particular college
  • The percentage of students actually getting institutional grants or rebates from colleges to attract enrollment
  • How much money a particular college devotes to the core mission of higher education

The Forbes College Financial Grades, which use the two most recent fiscal years available from the Department of Education (2011 and 2010), are published in the magazine’s August 13 issue.