Hollins Named a 2016 “Best College Value” by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance

Hollins University has been named to Kiplinger’s Personal Finance‘s list of the Top 300 Best College Values of 2016. Introduced in 1998, the rankings highlight public schools, private universities, and private liberal arts colleges that combine outstanding academics with affordable cost. In addition, Kiplinger has ranked the top 100 best values in each category.

Hollins earned the #96 spot on the magazine’s list of 100 best values in private liberal arts colleges.

Kiplinger assesses value by measurable standards of academic quality and affordability. Quality measures include the admission rate, the percentage of students who return for sophomore year, the student-faculty ratio, and four-year graduation rate. Cost criteria include sticker price, financial aid, and average debt at graduation.

“We start with a universe of 1,200 schools, so each school on our rankings is a best value,” said Janet Bodnar, editor of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine. “Families can use the list as a starting point and then tailor it to each student’s preference for such things as size, location, campus culture, and major.”

The complete rankings are now available online at Kiplinger.com/links/college and will appear in the February 2016 issue of Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, on newsstands January 5.


Gerald Named to Roanoke Valley Horse Show Hall of Fame

L.M. “Sandy” Gerald, head coach of the Hollins University riding team, has been inducted into the Roanoke Valley Horse Show (RVHS) Hall of Fame.

Gerald served as hunter/jumper manager for the RVHS from 2009 – 2014.

According to Lorrie McCloskey, a director of the Roanoke Valley Horseman’s Association (which sponsors the RVHS), Gerald “went way above and beyond in his dedication to making the show a success each year he served as manager. He shared his many talents and trademark positive attitude, and definitely went outside the parameters of the usual duties of a horse show manager.”

McCloskey noted that even though Gerald is no longer the horse show’s hunter/jumper manager, he continues to work with the RVHS as the organization seeks to hold an event in 2016.

“His commitment to the past and future success of the Roanoke Valley Horse Show is unparalleled. He is one of the most universally loved members of the horse show team, and a most deserving member of the Roanoke Valley Horse Show Hall of Fame.”

Gerald is a seven-time Old Dominion Athletic Conference Coach of the Year and was inducted into the Southwest Virginia Hunter/Jumper Association Hall of Fame in 2006.


Hollins Alumna Honored for Achievement in Neuroscience

Mary Beth Hatten, a member of Hollins’ class of 1971, is the recipient of the prestigious Max Cowan Award for 2015.

Presented by the Journal of Comparative Neurology and Wiley Publishers in conjunction with The Cajal Club, the Cowan Award is given in odd-numbered years to a neuroscientist for outstanding work in developmental neuroscience.

Hatten is the Frederick P. Rose Professor in the Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology at The Rockefeller University in New York City. After completing her Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry at Hollins, she earned a Ph.D. in biochemical sciences from Princeton University in 1975 and went on to do her postdoctoral research in neuroscience at Harvard Medical School. She was on the New York University School of Medicine faculty from 1978 to 1987 and then at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University. She came to Rockefeller in 1992 and was named the Frederick P. Rose Professor in 2000. In 2005, Hatten was Wiersma Visiting Professor of Neuroscience at the California Institute of Technology.

In 1991, Hatten received the McKnight Endowment Fund for Neuroscience Investigator Award, the Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award, and a Faculty Award for Women Scientists and Engineers from the National Science Foundation. Her other honors include the Irma T. Hirschl Fund Career Scientist Award (1980); the Pew Neuroscience Award (1988); and the Weil Award from the American Association of Neuropathologists (1996). She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Hatten was officially presented the Cowan Award during the Cajal Club Social on October 18 in Chicago. The club was founded in 1947 to provide an opportunity for neuroscientists with special interests in the structure and function of the nervous system to associate; contribute to the welfare of neuroanatomy and neuroatomists; and revere the founder of modern neuroscience, Santiago Ramón y Cajal.

 

 


Hollins Writers Make National Book Awards Shortlists

Two Hollins authors are among the twenty finalists for one of the nation’s most prestigious literary prizes, the National Book Awards.

Five finalists each in the Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, and Young People’s Literature categories were announced on October 14.

Karen E. Bender, who joined the Hollins faculty this fall as the university’s Distinguished Visiting Professor of Creative Writing, is a first-time finalist in the Fiction category for her short-story collection, Refund. She is the author of the novels Like Normal People and A Town of Empty Rooms, and her fiction has appeared in The New Yorker and other magazines. She has previously won two Pushcart Prizes.

“The tales told in Karen Bender’s Refund, a collection of stories that centers on money and family, are exquisitely composed portraits of modern life, and chances are you will encounter characters that remind you a little or a lot of yourself,” said the Chicago Tribune. “That’s the brilliance of Bender’s storytelling….[her] ability to transform observations of life into uncomfortably realistic stories cannot be denied.” 

Hollins alumna and world-renowned photographer Sally Mann is on the shortlist in the Nonfiction category for her memoir, Hold Still. She has previously received awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Guggenheim Foundation, and her photographs are held by major institutions internationally.

The New York Times called Hold Still “uncommonly beautiful” while The Atlantic described the bestseller as “gorgeously written and convincing.”

Mann’s many books include Second Sight (1983), At Twelve (1988), Immediate Family (1992), Still Time (1994), What Remains (2003), Deep South (2005), Proud Flesh (2009), and The Flesh and the Spirit (2010).

The National Book Awards will honor this year’s winners at a ceremony in New York City on November 18. Each recipient will be given a bronze sculpture and a $10,000 cash prize.

 


Hollins Among the Nation’s Top 100 Liberal Arts Colleges that Contribute to the Public Good

Hollins University is one of the top 100 liberal arts colleges in the nation, according to Washington Monthly’s 2015 College Guide and Rankings.

Hollins is ranked #98 and is one of only four Virginia colleges to earn a spot in the top 100, joining Emory & Henry College (#36), Washington and Lee University (#56), and the University of Richmond (#79).

Washington Monthly says its college guide differs from similar publications in that it “asks not what colleges can do for you, but what colleges are doing for the country.

“We rate schools based on their contribution to the public good in three broad categories: Social Mobility (recruiting and graduating low-income students), Research (producing cutting-edge style scholarship and PhDs), and Service (encouraging students to give something back to their country).”


Hollins Authors to Contend for 2015 National Book Awards

A Hollins alumna and a current member of the university faculty are among the acclaimed authors who have been named to Longlists for this year’s National Book Awards.

Sally Mann ’74, M.A. ’75 is one of ten contenders for the 2015 National Book Award for Nonfiction. She has been nominated for her work, Hold Still: A Memoir with Photographs. One of America’s most renowned photographers, Mann has previously received awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Guggenheim Foundation. Her photographs are held by major institutions internationally. Her many books include Second Sight (1983), At Twelve (1988), Immediate Family (1992), Still Time (1994), What Remains (2003), Deep South (2005), Proud Flesh (2009), and The Flesh and the Spirit (2010).

Cited for her short-story collection Refund,  Distinguished Visiting Professor of Creative Writing Karen E. Bender is on the Longlist for the National Book Award for Fiction. She is the author of the novels Like Normal People and A Town of Empty Rooms, and her fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Granta, Zoetrope, Ploughshares, Story, Harvard Review, The Iowa Review, and other magazines. She has won two Pushcart Prizes and grants from the Rona Jaffe Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. She has taught creative writing at Antioch University Los Angeles, the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, and Tunghai University in Taiwan.

The National Book Award is one of the nation’s most prestigious literary prizes. Previous winners include Sherman Alexie, Louise Erdrich, Jonathan Franzen, Denis Johnson, James McBride, Joyce Carol Oates, and Adrienne Rich.

Finalists will be announced on October 14.

 


U.S. News Places Hollins Among the Best National Liberal Arts Colleges

Hollins University is one of the top liberal arts colleges and universities in the country, according to the publication, 2016 U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges.

U.S. News released this year’s rankings online on September 9.

Hollins is ranked number 108 in the category, Best National Liberal Arts Colleges. It is tied with Hampden-Sydney College as the fourth highest-ranked liberal arts college in Virginia, behind Washington and Lee University, the University of Richmond, and Virginia Military Institute.

Hollins is also among the nation’s ten highest-ranked women’s colleges.

U.S. News states that it calculates its rankings using “quantitative measures that education experts have proposed as reliable indicators of academic quality.

“The indicators we use to capture academic quality fall into a number of categories: assessment by administrators at peer institutions, retention of students, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources, alumni giving, graduation rate performance and, for National Universities and National Liberal Arts Colleges only, high school counselor ratings of colleges.”

For more information, visit http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges.

 


Senior Receives Distinguished Student Researcher Award

In recognition of the exceptional environmental research she performed while studying abroad during the spring of 2015, The School for Field Studies (SFS) has presented its Distinguished Student Researcher Award to Kayla Deur ’16. She was recognized for the research project she conducted at the SFS Center for Mekong Studies in Cambodia.

Each year, the SFS honors a student from the Center who has demonstrated extraordinary skill in contributing to the Center’s research agenda, as evidenced by their Directed Research (DR) paper, oral presentations, and approach to the research project. The award not only cites excellence and diligence in research, but also teamwork and leadership shown during the semester. Outcomes of the projects provide information and recommendations to community members and other stakeholders on critical, local environmental issues.

Deur explored the usage of traditional medicine on a household level, as well as how traditional knowledge is being transmitted cross-generationally and spatially across village domains. According to Lisa Granese, SFS vice president for enrollment and institutional relations, “Her work provides a sound foundation for future research at the Center, and Professor Lisa Arensen, Deur’s DR advisor, comments that her project ‘is an impressive example of undergraduate research.'” Through her work, Deur contributed to a growing list of plants that were indicated as medicinally important by locals.

SFS creates transformative study abroad experiences through field-based learning and research. Its educational programs explore the human and ecological dimensions of the complex environmental problems faced by its local partners, contributing to sustainable solutions in the places where people live and work. The SFS community is part of a growing network of individuals and institutions committed to environmental stewardship.


Hollins Lacrosse Among IWLCA Division III Academic Honor Squads

The Hollins University lacrosse team is one of 129 colleges and universities from across the nation, and one of six Old Dominion Athletic Conference member schools, that have been cited as Division III Academic Honor Squads for the 2015 season.

Schools with a team GPA of 3.0 or higher are eligible for Academic Squad recognition. Division I, II, III, and NAIA schools that earn this designation are announced annually by the Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association (IWLCA).

Hollins Lacrosse’s 2016 schedule kicks off  February 27 with a match at the University of the District of Columbia.


Hollins Featured in “The Best 380 Colleges”; Theatre Program Is Ranked Among the Nation’s 20 Best

The Princeton Review has named Hollins University one of the nation’s best institutions for undergraduate education.

Hollins is included in the new 2016 edition of the education services company’s flagship college guide, The Best 380 Colleges. In addition, the publication ranks the university 19th in the country in the category, “Best College Theater.”

According to The Princeton Review, only about 15% of America’s 2,500 four-year colleges and only four colleges outside the U.S. are profiled in the book. Published annually since 1992, it includes detailed profiles of the colleges with rating scores for all schools in eight categories, plus ranking lists of top 20 schools in the book in 62 categories based on The Princeton Review’s surveys of students attending the colleges.

“Hollins’ outstanding academics are the chief reason we chose it for this book and we strongly recommend it to applicants,” says Robert Franek, Princeton Review’s Senior VP-Publisher and author of The Best 380 Colleges.  “We make our selections primarily based on data we collect through our annual surveys of administrators at several hundred four-year colleges. Additionally, we give considerable weight to observations from our school visits, opinions of our staff and our 23-member National College Counselor Advisory Board, and an unparalleled amount of feedback we get from our surveys of students attending these schools. We also keep a wide representation of colleges in the book by region, size, selectivity and character.”

In its profile of Hollins, The Princeton Review notes, “Students at Hollins ‘adore the school.’ The women of Hollins describe themselves as ‘empowered, enthusiastic,’ ‘worldly, aware,’ ‘strong, and confident.’” Underscoring Hollins Theatre’s high national ranking in The Best 380 Colleges, the profile quotes students as stating that the program “is excellent, and the shows are always worth going to.”

The Princeton Review does not rank the colleges from 1 to 380 in any category.  Instead it uses students’ ratings of their schools to compile 62 ranking lists of top 20 colleges in the book in various categories. The lists in this edition are entirely based on The Princeton Review’s survey of 136,000 students (about 358 per campus on average) attending the colleges. The 80-question survey asks students to rate their schools on several topics and report on their campus experiences. Topics range from their assessments of their professors as teachers to opinions about their school’s library, career services, and student body’s political leanings. The Princeton Review explains the basis for each ranking list at http://www.princetonreview.com/college-rankings/ranking-methodology.

The Best 380 Colleges is the 24th edition of The Princeton Review’s annual Best Colleges book.