“Prelude to C3: A Virtual Conference” Connects Students With the Green And Gold Network

Mindful of COVID-19 protocols, Hollins alumnae/i this fall are employing a different way of conveying the lifelong power of a liberal arts education to current students.

In conjunction with Hollins Alumnae Relations and the Center for Career Development and Life Design, Hollins grads are taking the annual Career Connection Conference (C3) online with Prelude to C3: A Virtual Conference, September 28 – October 3.


Above Photo: Networking at the 2019 C3 conference

 

“Students will be able to hear some of our most accomplished alumnae/i share their insights on navigating life after Hollins,” said Director of Alumnae Relations Lauren Walker. “Since most jobs don’t come from postings but through personal and professional connections, students can maximize their future opportunities by interacting throughout the week with the Green and Gold network at C3.”

This year’s C3 will include Zoom sessions covering a wide array of topics and interests:

Monday, September 28
Healing and Healthcare
The paths that led professionals in health-related fields to their current roles and the ways in which one can make a difference in improving the well-being of others.

Life After Hollins
Tried-and-true strategies on relocating to a new city, finding housing, managing finances, finding a mentor and new social network, and overcoming transitional challenges.

Tuesday, September 29
Aiming for Advanced Study
When is a graduate degree a ticket to upward mobility and when might it carry unacceptable costs or debt?

Wednesday, September 30
Curating Culture
Finding ways in different roles and work/life configurations to keep the arts and humanities alive for oneself and others.

Brand Yourself: Monitor Your Media Image
What are employers looking for in one’s online presence and social media profiles? How does one use media most effectively for networking and job hunting?

Thursday, October 1
Innovative Endeavors
The innovative mindset required to stay agile and find new business opportunities in a rapidly changing world.

Friday, October 2
What Can I Do with a Science and Math Degree?
Representing business, data analytics, scientific research, and environmental compliance, alumnae/i in this session will discuss pioneering into fields where women have been historically unrepresented.

Life After Hollins
(See description above)

The final day of Prelude to C3: A Virtual Conference on Saturday, October 3, will feature a morning keynote address by Aheri Stanford-Asiyo ’05, a software engineer at Microsoft working to create next-generation holographic computing solutions for the workplace. Prior to joining Microsoft’s Mixed Reality team, she served as a senior JavaScript engineer at the Accenture Liquid Studio, a rapid-prototyping facility in Silicon Valley.

The afternoon will be devoted to one-on-one Zoom sessions between students and alumnae/i for the purpose of career mentoring through general networking and informational interviews.

“Whether you are a first-year student or a senior, a double major or undecided, career-ambitious or career-confused, there is a place for you at C3,” said Walker.

 

 

 


Accessing Our Network: One of Hollins’ Greatest Strengths

My Hollins University experience began differently than most students. Growing up on the campus had a significant impact on my early development. I was able to witness intelligent, strong, and creative students that went on to do amazing things. My mother, Jeri Suarez (Hollins’ associate dean of cultural and community engagement), and all of her students became the best role models a girl could ask for during her formative years. I was surrounded by love and empowering figures from an early age, and that continued to grow as I did. I have seen what Hollins can do for its students, firsthand, and when it came time for me to pick a school, I couldn’t think of a better fit for me.

The opportunities that I have had over the last four years have been unique and rewarding. Had I gone to another institution, I may not have received the tremendous mentoring, opportunities to develop strong research skills, or traveled the world as I did. At Hollins, helping students succeed and reach their fullest potential is the norm, not the exception.

I found my love of research at the Roanoke Valley Governor’s School, which provided the outlet to conduct psychological experiments and examine the real-world implications. I fell in love with the process, the emotional rollercoaster that is caring about something enough to dig deeper. Going into my first year at Hollins, I knew that I wanted to conduct research that would be impactful. Over the last four years, I had many opportunities to conduct my own research and assist in many others. In the psychology department, there are options to conduct research through classes but also working closely with professors on their research projects. At the end of my first year, I was given the chance to work in the child development laboratory with Associate Professor of Psychology Tiffany Pempek. This invaluable time in her laboratory strengthened my research abilities, interpersonal skills and confidence. The course I took on research statistics with Professor of Psychology Bonnie Bowers is something I access daily in my current position.

Each year, the Career Center and the Office of Alumnae Relations host the Career Connection Conference (C3), a wonderful event for current students to talk with alumnae and to hear their career advice. During my second year, I met Lauren Staley ’11. She worked at the American Institutes for Research (AIR). Lauren spoke about her time at Hollins and the experiences she had working with the non-profit organization. I knew that was a path I wanted to pursue. She gave me her contact information and said that I could stay in touch as I explored my career path.

The summer between my junior and senior years, I received a research internship at the Addiction Recovery Research Center (Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC), while working on my senior honors thesis. It was time to explore my future plans. My goal was to gain additional work experience, conducting research at a professional level, before entering graduate school. I wrote to Lauren Staley in the fall of my senior year to ask for her advice about applying to work for AIR. She connected me to a former colleague who helped me immensely in the application process.

Applying for a job becomes more daunting in the face of a global pandemic. But, by accessing the Hollins network, as well as my college preparation, I had the confidence to pursue a position with AIR. I was offered an interview with the organization. Due to COVID-19, the process was a 2.5-hour interview over Skype with multiple researchers. Although it felt intimidating at times, I was well prepared and confident in my abilities and able to showcase them.

I have been working at AIR for two months now. I split my time between two departments: the Annual Reports – Digest of Education Statistics team and the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies. These two divisions are committed to increasing the effectiveness of education at every level through research, analysis, training, and assistance in the technical field. AIR’s commitment to research and evaluation provides important insight for policy makers and practitioners with which to guide implementation of certain programs, techniques, and funding. I have since gained new skills in programming, data checking, writing research proposals, and website design. I am honored to be working at this incredible organization.

Hollins helped me develop my skill set and confidence to take chances and to dream bigger. At 19 years old, I did not realize that a 15-minute conversation with an alumna would lead to my first professional position. I thank everyone who helped me on this journey.

 

 


Rosie Wong ’22 Embraces Grass-Roots Activism During Peace Boat US Internship

As an international student, Chin Wai “Rosie” Wong ’22 is passionate about working with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that focus on different languages and cultures. So, when she learned Peace Boat US in New York City was offering four internships to Hollins students during this year’s January Short Term, she seized the opportunity.

Combining learning, activism, advocacy, and travel, Peace Boat enables people from the U.S. and around the world to study first-hand about global concerns such as war, environmental degradation, gender violence, and other issues. Wong and her fellow Hollins interns – Irina Conc ‘21, Leena Gurung ‘22, and Sajila Kanwal ’22 – worked closely with Peace Boat US Director Emilie McGlore on a variety of internal projects, including research, data entry, writing, and design. They also connected with other NGOs, United Nations (UN) departments, and colleges and universities to help build partnerships.

“This experience helped me gain a better understanding of how an international NGO operates and realize that the way to make a change is through action starting at the grass-roots level,” Wong said.

Peace Boat 2020 Interns
Peace Boat US in New York City welcomed four Hollins students as interns during this year’s January Short Term.

Wong, Conc, Gurung, and Kanwal attended and wrote articles about various special events such as UN programs, a fundraiser for Australian wildlife affected by the wildfires on the continent, and a New York City Council meeting on nuclear disarmament.

“At the council hearing we got the chance to read testimonies of the survivors of the dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki,” Wong explained. “They described their personal experience and trauma and urged the council and committee members to support the total abolition of nuclear weapons and their development.”

The communication studies major called working with Peace Boat US “a wonderful internship experience. It allowed me to see what is expected and what it is like to work in real life. It was also a lesson in what an organization is looking for and what I am looking for, and to see what I am capable of and what I need to work on more.”

Wong stressed that her time with the NGO gave her a tremendous sense of pride. “I wasn’t just an individual working for Peace Boat US. I was actually a representative of the organization, which cultivated a greater sense of responsibility in me. I felt this honor whenever I wrote, talked, or even walked on the street. I also felt proud to be one of the Hollins students working with Peace Boat US, enhancing the connection between Hollins University and Peace Boat, and paving the way for myself and my fellow Hollins students.”

Back at Hollins, Wong said she is looking forward to studying different kinds of writing, and her interest in learning more languages has grown as well.  “In the future I would love to be a language teacher, spreading knowledge and love and bringing about positivity to society. I plan to volunteer as a language teacher on board a Peace Boat voyage one day and welcome a new chapter in my life.”


The Princeton Review Places Hollins Among Nation’s Best for Alumni Networks, Internships, and Value

Announcing its Best Value Colleges for 2020, The Princeton Review has ranked Hollins University as having the #5 Best Alumni Network in the country and #21 in the category Best Schools for Internships.

The Best Alumni Network rankings are based on college student ratings of alumni activity and visibility on campus, while the Best Schools for Internships are determined by student ratings of accessibility of internship placement at their school.

The education services company also selected Hollins as one of the nation’s top 200 colleges “for students seeking a superb education with great career preparation at an affordable price.”

The Princeton Review chose its Best Value Colleges for 2020 based on data the company collected from its surveys of administrators at 656 colleges in 2018-19. The company also factored in data from its surveys of students attending the schools as well as PayScale.com surveys of alumni of the schools about their starting and mid-career salaries and job satisfaction figures.

In all, The Princeton Review crunched more than 40 data points to tally ROI (Return on Investment) ratings of the colleges that determined its selection of the 200 schools for the 2020 project. Topics covered everything from academics, cost, and financial aid to graduation rates, student debt, alumni salaries, and job satisfaction.

“The schools we name as our Best Value Colleges for 2020 comprise only 7% of the nation’s four-year colleges,” said Robert Franek, The Princeton Review’s editor-in-chief. “They are truly distinctive and diverse in their programs, size, region, and type, yet they are similar in three areas. Every school we selected offers outstanding academics, generous financial aid and/or a relative low cost of attendance, and stellar career services.

“We salute Hollins University for these exceptional offerings and recommend it highly to college applicants and parents.”

 


HireHollins: Employer-Talent Showcase to Feature Mix of Mentoring, Networking, and Recruiting

Hollins University students will have the opportunity to interact with more than 25 area businesses and organizations during the first-ever HireHollins: Employer – Talent Showcase, which will be held Tuesday, March 5, from noon – 4:30 p.m. in Moody Student Center.

“Today’s Generation Z is drawn to relevant, hands-on, interactive learning,” says Karen Cardozo, Hollins’ executive director of career development. “Thus, this is not a traditional ‘job fair’ but an experiential interface with a dynamic mix of networking, mentoring, and recruiting.”

Cardozo notes that this event “gives priority to regional partners offering year-round internship opportunities or organizations with summer pipelines to postgraduate hiring,” and that the experience will be equally as beneficial to the participating companies.

“Hollins is a diverse talent pipeline, with the overall undergraduate population closing in on 30% women of color from around the world. Second, we offer an exemplary liberal arts education in which our students study issues from a variety of disciplines and methods. And third, Hollins boasts a culture of creativity: While our most popular majors are business, biology, psychology, and English/creative writing, students of all majors often engage in the arts.”

Employers that have recently sponsored internships for Hollins students, Cardozo adds, have given those students exceptional reviews. “Supervisors told us: ‘Hollins students show a great balance of writing, communication, and organizational skills.’ ‘They execute large tasks with little supervision and are well-prepared for the professional world.’ ‘They are open to new ideas and willing to participate in diverse activities.’ And, ‘They were self-motivated and looked for ways to learn outside the assigned projects.’”

During the showcase’s first hour, students can visit information tables to meet organization representatives. An hour of one-on-one networking will follow. The final two hours will be devoted to sessions focusing on a wide range of career fields and topics. These sessions include:

  • Roanoke Regional Opportunities: Your Star Can Rise in Roanoke!
  • Working for Nonprofits: Supporting Our Communities
  • Arts/Arts Management: Encouraging Creativity
  • Exploring Different Business Models in Established and New Industries
  • Government/Public Sector: Leading and Serving
  • Mental Health Professions: Caring and Healing

Organizations taking part in the HireHollins: Employer – Talent Showcase reflect the breadth and scope of the business, nonprofit, government, healthcare, and arts sectors in the region:

  • Allied Universal Security
  • Allstate
  • Blue Ridge YMCA
  • Botetourt YMCA
  • City of Roanoke
  • Roanoke City Council
  • Cortex Leadership Consulting
  • Council of Community Services
  • Family Service of the Roanoke Valley
  • Farmers Insurance and Financial Solutions
  • FAVE Solutions
  • Goodwill Industries of the Valleys
  • Hotel Roanoke and Conference Center
  • Intercept Youth Services
  • Mainstream Mental Health Services
  • Office of U.S. Senator Tim Kaine
  • Rappahannock Electric Cooperative
  • Roanoke-Blacksburg Technology Council
  • Roanoke County Economic Development
  • Roanoke Regional Partnership
  • Roanoke Valley – Alleghany Regional Commission
  • Taubman Museum of Art
  • Treehouse Collaborative
  • United Way of Roanoke Valley
  • Virginia Society of CPAs
  • Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine

“The Hollins curriculum emphasizes communication, critical thinking, leadership, and cross-cultural and information literacies,” Cardozo says. “At the same time, our Career Center is preparing students for a world of disruptive change in which employees and their organizations must be flexible and responsive in order to not only survive, but thrive. The companies participating in this showcase are all well-positioned to advise our students on how to succeed in their respective industries, and we welcome their expertise.”


Princeton Review Touts Hollins as a “Best Value College”

Hollins University is one of the nation’s best colleges for students seeking a superb education with great career preparation at an affordable price, according to The Princeton Review.

The education services company profiles Hollins in the 2019 edition of its annual guide, The Best Value Colleges: 200 Schools with Exceptional ROI for Your Tuition Investment, published by Penguin Random House/Princeton Review Books.

Information on the book, including its school profiles, is accessible for free on The Princeton Review’s website.

“We salute Hollins and all of our Best Value Colleges. They stand out for their outstanding academics and their affordability via generous financial aid to students with need and/or comparatively low sticker prices,” said Robert Franek, The Princeton Review’s editor-in-chief and lead author of the book. “Students at these colleges also have access to extraordinary career services from their freshman year on, plus a lifetime of valuable alumnae/i support.” The Princeton Review ranks Hollins #17 in the category, “Top 25 Best Alumni Networks.”

The book’s editors at The Princeton Review state, “A Hollins education is an affordable education. And students are thrilled to report that the Financial Aid Office is nothing short of ‘fantastic.’ Importantly, through a combination of need-based aid, scholarships, and cost-effective loans and grants, the university is able to distribute over $24 million annually in financial aid.”

The editors add, “The career outlook for Hollins students is pretty rosy. That’s partially thanks to the fact that undergrads are able to tap into a ‘highly active alumni base.’ They also have a wonderful Career Center at their disposal. Indeed, from the beginning of the first year, undergrads can swing by the office and start plotting their path to career success.”

The Princeton Review crunched more than 40 data points to tally ROI (return on investment) ratings of the colleges that determined its selection of the 200 schools for the book. Topics ranged from academics, cost, and financial aid to graduation rates, student debt, alumnae/i salaries, and job satisfaction.

Hollins University encourages prospective students to visit its campus to experience a “Best Value College” for themselves.

 


Career Center Partners with One of the Nation’s Top Networking Platforms for Students

The Hollins University Career Center has announced its collaboration with Handshake, a premier career management system that connects students with Fortune 500 companies and hundreds of other organizations for jobs and internships and offers a wide range of educational resources.

Launched in 2014, Handshake has been called “a powerful new tool [for] college students looking to start their careers” by Inc. magazine. Fast Company notes, “The days of ‘it’s not what you know, it’s who you know’ may be nearing an end now that college students can Handshake their way to better job opportunities, ” and quotes Jason Aldrich, an assistant dean at Georgia State University, as stating that “…because [Handshake]  attracts top employers who traditionally recruit at only a small number of schools, it is already helping to democratize access to more opportunities for everyone on campus, particularly our first-generation and underrepresented minority students.”

Hollins alumnae and other employers in any location are welcome to post job and internship opportunities in Handshake, and can contact the Career Center at careercenter@hollins.edu for more details.

In another effort to boost employer relations while improving access to internships and student postgraduate outcomes, the Career Center is presenting HireHollins: Employer-Talent Showcase on March 5, 2019.

“This will not be a traditional career services ‘job fair,’ but an experiential interface with a mix of networking, mentoring, and recruiting,” says Karen Cardozo, Hollins’ executive director of career development. “This special event begins with table browsing at lunch so students can get information and see who is present. Then, employers will offer recruiting workshops and coaching sessions, followed by one-on-one networking. It’s going to be a dynamic and interactive afternoon with an emphasis on regional partners who can provide a pipeline to postgraduate hiring.”

 


Alumnae Share Expertise from Multitude of Fields at C3

“Welcome to the network!”

With that enthusiastic greeting to a packed audience of students in the Hollins Theatre, Judy Lambeth ’73 kicked off the opening session of the university’s sixth annual Career Connection Conference (C3), held October 23. Seventy-nine Hollins alumnae from a variety of fields returned to campus to talk about how they have translated their liberal arts education into satisfying careers. They also provided tips, tools, and tricks of the trade to land that first job.

“By attending Hollins, you are now a member of our alumnae network,” said Lambeth, who chairs Hollins’ Board of Trustees as well as the university’s alumnae engagement initiative. “That’s a community of highly intelligent, independent-minded, audacious women who are here today to help you in any way they can. We believe passionately that Hollins prepared us well for fulfilling lives and careers, and our education continues to enrich us every single day. Being a member of the Hollins community is a lifelong gift, and we are grateful for that. So, we want to give back by having your back. We are here today specifically to support you. We want you to soar, we want you to love whatever life throws at you and embrace it.”

During C3, students and alumnae engaged in the following events:

  • Interactive sessions featuring career women from the sciences, writing and publishing, business, financial services, education, law, visual and performing arts, and public service.
  • Special topics designed to facilitate alumnae testimonials and communicate practical skill sets. Highlights included building an effective resume, money matters, and life after Hollins, among others.
  • “Speed networking” with a large number of alumnae, as well meeting one-on-one through mock interviews, resume critiques, and conversations about the graduate school application process.
  • Small group discussions after the conference on a variety of topics, including diversity in the workplace.

Tina Wells, CEO and founder of Buzz Marketing Group, was this year’s C3 keynote speaker. Wells’ agency creates marketing strategies for clients within the beauty, entertainment, fashion, financial, and lifestyle sectors. She has spent nearly two decades connecting influencers and consumers to brand clients.

Wells’ address focused on the theme “What’s Next?” and offered “a little handbook you can use to figure out how to build those first ten years post-college, because the life I enjoy today is due to the work I did in those first ten years.” She noted the importance of  “developing that personal network, that personal board of directors that helps you make those key decisions and who holds you accountable. ‘Does this make sense?’ ‘Am I showing up authentically?’ ‘Am I doing what I’m supposed to be doing?’ Who better than your peers to call you on that.”

Wells encouraged students to join professional associations (“Is the industry you’re in on the rise or declining? Where are the jobs going to be over the next five years? These associations have all that information.”) as well as social clubs (“Too often when we graduate we think we have to be serious people and forget that we need to have fun.”). She also recommended creating a group of five like-minded peers (“Meet monthly with a group of people who have similar goals and visions and think about the world in a specific way. Be committed and helpful to one another and give each other tools. Don’t be competitive, but hold each other responsible for meeting goals.”).

Wells also emphasized her personal philosophy, “You can’t make withdrawals where you haven’t made deposits. Never go into a situation saying, ‘Can you give me….’ or ‘Can I pick your brain?’ There is always something you can do. Constantly ask yourself, ‘Am I making a request or am I contributing? How do I contribute the most to the places that matter the most to me?'”

In that vein, Lambeth urged students to share their own personal and professional experiences in the years to come. “We’re hoping you’ll change the world and we’re also hoping that on some future day, when you’ve found your career path, please come back to Hollins, attend a Career Connections Conference, and do the same thing for another generation of Hollins students.”

 

Photo caption: Tina Wells, CEO and founder of Buzz Marketing Group, was the keynote speaker for Hollins’ sixth annual Career Connection Conference (C3).

 

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With Hollins Know-How and Connections, Recent Grad Gains Opportunity at Major Strategic Communications Firm

Just a few months after graduation, Tegan Harcourt ’17 is working with a company globally renowned for strategic planning and communications consultation, thanks to her Hollins experience and the backing of a dedicated alumnae network.

The international business major is a market research associate with New York City’s Berland Strategy & Analytics, which gauges public opinion, attitudes, and behaviors and crafts strategies for businesses and organizations to effectively compete in a range of venues worldwide. Berland has worked with the presidential campaigns of Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton as well as such diverse clients as the Estée Lauder Companies, Harvard Stem Cell Institute, and the National Hockey League.

Harcourt’s journey to Berland began during her senior year at Hollins. “I was looking into what I wanted to do post-grad and there were so many things I was interested in that I wasn’t sure what to prioritize in my search,” she recalls. “But I was fortunate enough to be on the Presidential Search Committee last year as well as a guest member for Hollins Board of Trustees meetings in my role as president of the Student Government Association (SGA).”

Harcourt reached out to the committee and the board and “received an overwhelming amount of help and support. I am so grateful to everyone who contacted their network for me.” Committee member and trustee Alexandra Trower ’86 talked with Harcourt about her interest in market segmentation and her background in cultural studies and politics, and connected her with Berland Strategy & Analytics CEO Mike Berland. Their conversation resulted in an in-person interview in New York City over spring break in March, and “after meeting some of the team and few more phone interviews we worked out plans for a three-month internship with the potential for full-time employment if both sides felt it was a good fit by the end.”

Harcourt started her internship in late June and was “immediately fascinated. It’s a fierce, tight-knit group of intelligent, creative, and dedicated people taking on massive projects with very quick turnarounds. It was really great to start contributing to the work in a meaningful way right from the start.”

To mark her internship’s one-month anniversary, Harcourt’s supervisors took her out to breakfast. “They said it was great having me there to jump on any project that needed help and complimented my willingness to put in the time and effort.” Her supervisors asked her to stay at Berland in a full-time position, two months before the completion of her internship, and she signed her official offer letter on August 11.

In her role as market research associate, Harcourt helps facilitate projects from start to finish, working with conceptualizing and background research and doing everything from field work and data analysis to insight development and suggestions for next steps. “When my supervisor is out of the office, I coordinate the project work flow to make sure everything is moving along as it should,” she explains. “We do quantitative research through surveys and social media analysis and qualitative research with focus groups.”

Harcourt enthusiastically credits Hollins with “propelling me to this opportunity and making me ready and confident enough to accept it. My education in business, Spanish, and women’s leadership is what allowed me to take on this position and be as successful as I have been.”

She also emphasizes the importance and impact of her activities outside the classroom. “My Hollins internships not only shaped my understanding of what kind of work I would be interested in but also gave me the opportunity to learn new skills, network, and fall in love with cities like my new home, New York City. My work in SGA pushed me to work hard, learn more, listen more intently, trust my dreams, and value the people around me.”

 

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Hollins Appoints Executive Director of Career Development

Hollins University has named Karen M. Cardozo executive director of career development. She will oversee Hollins’ Career Center and its programs and services, implementing the university’s strategic goal of collaborating with internal and external partners to create career development initiatives that will engage students throughout their undergraduate education and beyond.

Cardozo will serve as a consultant starting September 4 and will begin her full-time employment with Hollins on January 2, 2018.

Cardozo has worked as a career counselor at Harvard University and at Williams College, as a dean of student and academic affairs at Mount Holyoke College, and as a faculty member on all campuses of the Five College Consortium of Western Massachusetts (Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith colleges and the University of Massachusetts). She comes to Hollins from the Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts in the Berkshires, where she was a tenured associate professor of interdisciplinary studies. Her World of Work course provides substantive coaching by putting the question “Who am I and where am I going?” into cultural, historical, and philosophical context while introducing key principles of life design. Another of her courses, Leading Women, fosters a more inclusive understanding of leadership.

“I am well-equipped to translate career placement from the field back to the campus and vice versa: to educate families, employers, and the public about why a Hollins education is an excellent investment, and why hiring Hollins alumnae would be a smart move,” Cardozo said.

Cardozo holds a Ph.D. in literary American studies from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst; a M.Ed. in higher education administration, planning, and social policy from Harvard University; and a B.A. in English from Haverford College. She has authored articles for scholarly publications such as American Studies, Critical Sociology, Journal of Asian American Studies, and Pedagogy, and has presented on career, diversity, and women’s issues at the American Political Science Association; the Modern Language Association; National Women’s Studies Association; New York Leadership Education Conference; and the Society for Cultural Anthropology, as well as on many campuses. Informed by her work as a Ph.D. career coach for the international consulting firm The Professor Is In, she is currently completing a book entitled Careering Toward Authenticity: A Guide for Academics Who Want to Get a Life.

Founded in 1842, Hollins is an independent liberal arts university offering undergraduate liberal arts education for women, selected graduate programs for men and women, and community outreach initiatives. Hollins graduates contribute to and succeed in a vast array of fields because their experience has included not only a broad education in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, but also internships, study abroad, undergraduate research, and leadership training.

 

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