Hollins, Roanoke College Welcome Nominations for the 2020 Perry F. Kendig Awards

Nominations are now being accepted for the 2020 Perry F. Kendig Arts and Culture Awards, which recognize individuals, businesses, and organizations in the greater Roanoke region that provide exemplary leadership in or support for the arts.

The deadline for nominations is Tuesday, September 1, at 4 p.m. The nomination form and other information can be found at https://kendigawards.com/.

Celebrating 35 years this year of honoring excellence in arts and culture, the Kendig Awards have been co-sponsored by Hollins University and Roanoke College since 2013. The 2020 Kendig Awards will be presented at Hollins with the date/location to be announced.

Three Kendig Awards will be presented this year, one in each of the following categories:

  • Individual Artist (selected from all disciplines, including dance, literature, music, media arts, visual arts, and theatre)
  • Arts and/or Cultural Organization
  • Individual or Business Arts Supporter

Individuals, businesses, and organizations from the greater Roanoke region (which includes the counties of Botetourt, Franklin, and Roanoke, the cities of Roanoke and Salem, and the town of Vinton) are eligible, as are past Kendig Award recipients from 1985 – 2012. Programs and full-time employees of Hollins University and Roanoke College are now eligible to be nominated as well.

“The Kendig Awards program provides a focal point for celebrating the greater Roanoke region’s cultural identity,” said Hollins Interim President Nancy Oliver Gray. “This initiative enables all of us to realize and appreciate the vital role arts and culture play in economic development as well as education in our schools.”

“Presenting this annual program builds an even stronger arts and culture bridge between our campuses and the community,” added Roanoke College President Mike Maxey. “We are proud to join with Hollins to champion this celebration of the arts.”

Named for the late Perry F. Kendig, who served as president of Roanoke College and was an avid supporter and patron of the arts, the awards were presented by the Arts Council of the Blue Ridge for 27 years.


New Marquee Highlights Close Ties Between First Baptist Hollins and Hollins University

Hollins University has partnered with First Baptist Church Hollins to erect a new marquee for the church, which has had an enduring connection to the campus community.

The new display was installed at First Baptist Hollins in May. The project was made possible by financial support from Hollins’ Student Government Association as well as institutional and general funding from the university. The sign was produced by Time Technologies, Inc., of Roanoke.

First Baptist Hollins had its beginnings in the 19th century through another local spiritual center. Enon Baptist Church featured Hollins University founder Charles Lewis Cocke as a prominent member. He was instrumental in providing a place at Enon for African American community members to worship.

Around 1867, Enon’s African American parishioners established Greenridge Baptist Church on Plantation Road in Roanoke. While the church no longer exists, a cemetery with over 120 graves is still there, including the burial sites of Clem Bolden (1846-1929), a long-time Hollins employee, and his wife, Rebekah.

Sometime between 1881 and 1883, Greenridge decided to separate into two, different churches so that members could worship closer to home: Ebenezer Baptist in the Kingstown community, and Lovely Zion in the Hollins (formerly Oldfields) community. Destroyed by fire in 1905, Lovely Zion was rebuilt the following year, and in 1951 was renamed First Baptist Hollins.

Several prominent former Hollins employees are buried in the First Baptist Hollins cemetery, including Mary Emma Bruce (1910-2010), Caesar Morton (1848/50-1929), and Lewis Hunt (1885-1954). The Bolden, Bruce, Morton, and Hunt families have provided many years of service to Hollins; remarkably, several descendants are currently employed at the university.

A special dedication ceremony will be held at a later date, and a plaque will be added to the main church marquee that acknowledges the relationship between First Baptist Hollins and Hollins University.


Bartlett Tree Experts, Garden Club of Va. Provide Restoration Work in Hollins’ Beale Garden

Hollins University’s Beale Memorial Garden is one of nine historic locations in the commonwealth chosen by the Garden Club of Virginia (GCV) to receive restoration work donated to the conservation and preservation federation by Bartlett Tree Experts.

Beale Garden was established in 1930 in honor of Lucy Preston Beale, an 1864 Hollins graduate, by her daughter, Lucy Beale Huffman, who was also a Hollins alumna. GCV has funded Beale Garden since the area was dedicated, one of the nearly 50 projects to hold that distinction, and collaborated closely with the university to revitalize the garden in 2004. The partnership between Hollins and GCV continues to this day.

Bartlett is providing tree work along with a financial gift to GCV in recognition of the organization’s centennial celebration this year. The company became interested in GCV’s mission and its restoration and preservation efforts in particular after a representative participated in a recent GCV Restoration Committee Maintenance Workshop, an every-other-year program that seeks to educate and inform those on the ground at each restoration site.

Since its first restoration in 1929, GCV has used proceeds from its signature event, Historic Garden Week, to fund the ongoing renewal and protection of Virginia’s historic public gardens and landscapes, along with a research fellowship program for graduate students in landscape architecture. The GCV’s Restoration Committee, consisting of 15 members from the 47 clubs that make up the federation, oversees management of the proceeds from Historic Garden Week and serves as a liaison to the restoration properties throughout Virginia.


New Book by MFA Grads Supports Local Early Literacy Initiative

Two Hollins authors are helping to promote the benefits of reading with children from birth with the publication of their new book.

Copies of Slow Time, Hush Time by Jennifer Wood M.F.A. ’19 and Lucinda Rowe M.F.A. ’19, both alumnae of the university’s graduate programs in children’s literature and children’s book illustration, will be given for free to new mothers at Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital. The nonprofit organization Turn the Page, whose mission is to provide every child born in the Roanoke Valley with his or her own home library of books during the first three years of life, is coordinating the distribution. The book is part of Turn the Page’s Early Literacy project, which is co-directed by Hollins faculty members Anna Baynum, associate professor of education, and Tiffany Pempek, associate professor of psychology.

On every page of Slow Time, Hush Time are ways for parents to interact with their young child. The suggestions are intended to foster bonding, language, and social development, along with creating a foundation for a lifetime enjoyment of reading.


Biology, Chemistry Departments Donate Gloves to Aid in COVID-19 Response

The biology and chemistry departments at Hollins University are pitching in to help a local medical center during its response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The departments are donating 7700 examination gloves (77 boxes) to Carilion Clinic in answer to the health care organization’s request for donations of personal protective equipment and other surplus medical supplies from community organizations, corporations, and individuals to help protect staff and patients.

Professor of Biology Renee Godard is delivering the gloves to Carilion’s Roanoke drop-off center at Tanglewood Mall on Friday, March 27. Carilion has also established drop-off locations in Franklin County, Giles County, Lexington, the New River Valley, and Tazewell County. Questions about donations may be directed to PPE_Donations@carilionclinic.org.

Based in Roanoke, Carilion Clinic features a comprehensive network of hospitals, primary and specialty physician practices, and other complementary services to provide care to nearly one million Virginians.

 

Photo: Professor of Biology Renee Godard carries one of the 77 boxes of examination gloves the Hollins biology department is donating to Carilion Clinic.


Hollins Theatre Presents Revival of “Goodnight Moon: The Magical Musical,” Oct. 19-26

The musical version of a beloved children’s story that has sold millions of copies around the world is coming back to Hollins University this fall.

Goodnight Moon: The Magical Musical returns to Hollins Theatre, October 19 – 26. Based on the 1945 book by Margaret Wise Brown, a member Hollins’ class of 1932, the tale of the bunny who won’t go to sleep was adapted for the stage by Chad Henry. It was first presented in 2011 as the inaugural production of the Hollins Legacy Series, which was created to reimagine the work of Hollins writers as plays, musicals, and original theatre pieces. Hollins Theatre featured a revival of Goodnight Moon in 2015.

“We are working to make this show a great tradition here in Roanoke and a wonderful gift from Hollins to the community,” says Ernie Zulia, director of the Hollins Theatre Institute. “Along with six public performances, we are scheduling four performances for schoolchildren and are expecting as many as 2,000 kids to arrive here on buses throughout the run of the show.”

Goodnight Moon comes to the stage with whimsical costumes designed by California designer Amanda Quivey, lighting by Hollins resident designer Ann Courtney, and scenery by Disney artist Ryan Wineinger. Zulia describes the stage set as “a wondrous room filled with toys and pictures that comes to life before your eyes. The kittens, the mittens, the red balloon, and the cow jumping over the moon are all there, along with a few surprises. Goodnight Moon really is for children of all ages – we are proud that thousands of people have already seen the show over the years, and now it’s here for a new generation to enjoy.”

Hollins Theatre’s Main Stage will host the public performances of Goodnight Moon: The Magical Musical on Saturday, October 19, at 11 a.m.; Sunday, October 20, at 2 p.m.; Thursday and Friday, October 24 and 25, at 7:30 p.m.; and Saturday, October 26, at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for children under 12. For ticket sales and more information, visit www.hollins.edu/theatre or call the Hollins Theatre Box Office at (540) 362-6517.


Hollins, Roanoke College Announce Perry F. Kendig Award Winners for 2019

Susan Jennings, Jimmy Ray Ward, and The Studio School have been honored with this year’s Perry F. Kendig Arts and Culture Awards.

Co-sponsored by Hollins University and Roanoke College, the Kendig Awards program recognizes exemplary individuals, businesses, and organizations in Virginia’s Blue Ridge Region (counties of Roanoke, Botetourt, and Franklin, the cities of Roanoke and Salem, and the town of Vinton) that support excellence in the arts.

This year’s awards were presented during a ceremony at Roanoke College’s Olin Hall on September 24, hosted by Roanoke College President Michael C. Maxey and Hollins University Interim President Nancy Oliver Gray.

Jennings recently retired as the Arts and Culture Coordinator for the City of Roanoke and formerly was executive director of The Arts Council of the Blue Ridge. She continues to be an influential member on many advisory boards for the arts and a driving force behind the creation of initiatives such as Art for Everyone, Parks and Arts, and the Elmwood Park Restoration Project and Sculpture Garden. She played an instrumental part in the rebirth of downtown Roanoke through Center in the Square and the Taubman Museum of Art.

Ward has designed sets and exhibits for roughly 160 productions in 15 locations, and also teaches Radford University students to discover their unique talents. He is respected in the artistic community for his devotion to his craft; he is considered an exemplary collaborator and problem-solver, and has been brought back time and again by many organizations. From historical to whimsical, he has the impressive ability to convince an audience and is considered an “unsung MVP” for theatrical productions.

For 28 years, The Studio School has been a pioneer in arts education for the community.  It offers art classes in all media to students from beginners to professionals. Teachers are recognized artists both locally and nationally, and their skills draw students far and wide to attend individual and/or group classes. The Studio School also provides affordable opportunities to study abroad and to experience intensive sessions with visiting artists.

Named for the late Perry F. Kendig, who served as president of Roanoke College and was an avid supporter and patron of the arts, the Kendig Awards program was established in 1985 and presented annually by the Arts Council of the Blue Ridge through 2012. Hollins and Roanoke College first partnered the following year to bestow the honors. The institutions congratulate the 2019 winners.


Hollins, North Cross School Collaborate to Enhance Teachers’ Skills

Through a new partnership with Hollins University, teachers from Roanoke’s North Cross School are taking a significant step forward in growing their skills for the benefit of their students, their school, and their careers.

Beginning this fall, North Cross is providing for eight of their faculty members to earn a graduate degree at Hollins as part of their professional development. The teachers will all be working toward completing a Master of Arts in Teaching and Learning (MATL) at the university.

“This collaboration is not only a unique benefit to our faculty, but will strengthen our academic experience for students,” said North Cross Head of School Christian Proctor. “We have faculty from all areas of studies represented in this first group, so, ultimately, we will become more consistent in our academic approach across divisions and disciplines.”

The MATL at Hollins is designed for PreK-12 teachers who want to learn more about the practice of teaching; acquire and develop new knowledge; develop curricula in collaborative teams; and assume leadership roles within a school and/or school system.

“The teachers will be taking two classes each semester,” explained Lorraine Lange, director of the MATL as well as Hollins’ Master of Arts in Teaching and Master of Arts in Liberal Studies programs. “We anticipate their graduation in about two years.”

Students in the coed MATL program must complete six core courses online. Three program electives are also required, and as part of its partnership with North Cross, Hollins is customizing those electives and offering them to the eight teachers through face-to-face instruction. In lieu of a graduate thesis, the North Cross teachers will design an instructional classroom project intended to benefit their students.

“Students in the program have the opportunity to work with accomplished faculty in the areas essential in today’s continually changing landscape of PreK-12 education: writing, inquiry, instructional design, assessment, leadership, technology, and contemporary issues in education,” Lange stated. “Faculty members encourage collaborative efforts and provide opportunities for students, experienced teachers themselves, to learn from one another.”

To learn more about the MATL or the other coed graduate programs at Hollins, email hugrad@hollins.edu or call 540-362-6575.


Hollins, Roanoke College Announce Perry F. Kendig Award Nominees

Artists, arts advocates, and arts and cultural organizations are among the nominees for the 2019 Perry F. Kendig Arts and Culture Awards.

Co-sponsored by Hollins University and Roanoke College, the Kendig Awards program recognizes exemplary individuals, businesses, and organizations in Virginia’s Blue Ridge Region (counties of Roanoke, Botetourt and Franklin, the cities of Roanoke and Salem, and the town of Vinton) that support excellence in the arts.

This year’s winners will be announced at a special awards ceremony to be held at Roanoke College’s Olin Hall on Tuesday, September 24, at 5:30 p.m. If you are interested in attending this event, please RSVP to kendigawards@roanoke.edu by Tuesday, September 10.

Here are the nominees for the 2019 Kendig Awards:

  • Harvester Performance Center
    Since its opening in 2014, the Harvester has been a key promoter of economic development through the arts in Rocky Mount and Franklin County. The venue hosts 180-200 shows annually and visitors have come from all 50 states as well as 23 countries. In addition to showcasing a diverse array of entertainers, ranging from acclaimed musicians and comedians to up-and-coming talent, the Harvester has attracted new restaurants, lodging, and other business creation and expansion.
  • Susan Jennings
    Jennings recently retired as the Arts and Culture Coordinator for the City of Roanoke and formerly was executive director of The Arts Council of the Blue Ridge. She continues to be an influential member on many advisory boards for the arts and a driving force behind the creation of initiatives such as Art for Everyone, Parks and Arts, and the Elmwood Park Restoration Project and Sculpture Garden. She played an instrumental part in the rebirth of downtown Roanoke through Center in the Square and the Taubman Museum of Art.
  • Yvonne Olson
    Olson worked for The Arts Council of the Blue Ridge for 10 years and has generously volunteered over 2,000 hours of her time at the Taubman Museum of Art, where she also manages the newsletter Volunteer Voices. She has been integral to the success of such popular events as the Sidewalk Art Show and the CANstruction project.
  • RIDE Solutions
    A promoter of sustainable travel, RIDE Solutions has partnered with the Roanoke Arts Commission, the Art Mural Project, and other organizations to integrate art into the community of transportation. The Art by Bus program and Starline Performance Series, where art, music, and literature are implemented into travel with rolling galleries and concerts, are only two of the many projects they have initiated.
  • The Studio School
    For 28 years, The Studio School has been a pioneer in arts education for the community. It offers art classes in all media to students from beginners to professionals. Teachers are recognized artists both locally and nationally, and their skills draw students far and wide to attend individual and/or group classes. The Studio School also provides affordable opportunities to study abroad and to experience intensive sessions with visiting artists.
  • Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine
    VTCSOM places a priority on integrating arts and culture into the medical school experience. The focus of the school’s Creativity in Health Education program is to recognize the power or art in healing and recovery and teach students about the profound connection between art and medicine. Mini-Med Schools bring together these two disciplines with activities such as art shows and poetry contests. VTCSOM also presents art exhibitions in its hallways to reflect themes of healing.
  • Jimmy Ray Ward
    Ward has designed sets and exhibits for roughly 160 productions in 15 locations, and also teaches Radford University students to discover their unique talents. He is respected in the artistic community for his devotion to his craft; he is considered an exemplary collaborator and problem-solver, and has been brought back time and again by many organizations. From historical to whimsical, he has the impressive ability to convince an audience and is considered an “unsung MVP” for theatrical productions. 

Named for the late Perry F. Kendig, who served as president of Roanoke College and was an avid supporter and patron of the arts, the Kendig Awards were established in 1985 and presented annually by the Arts Council of the Blue Ridge through 2012. Hollins University and Roanoke College first partnered the following year to bestow the honors, and congratulates the 2019 slate of distinguished nominees.

For more information about the Kendig Awards, visit https://kendig.press.hollins.edu/.


Hollins Partners With City of Roanoke For Art By Bus, Writer By Bus Programs

Hollins is helping promote the value of public transportation to the Roanoke Valley by bringing visual arts and inspired writing onto the area’s bus network.

The university has joined RIDE Solutions, the Roanoke Arts Commission, and the Greater Roanoke Transit Company in presenting the annual Art By Bus and Writer By Bus programs, which this year showcase the talents of Hollins undergraduate and graduate students.

JM Lamb
Horizon student JM Lamb, whose design, “Wishes,” was selected for the fifth annual Art By Bus Program.

Associate Professor of Art Jennifer Printz led one of her classes in creating a series of original works, one of which would be selected to be installed on an entire half of a Valley Metro bus. “Wishes” by Horizon student JM Lamb (pictured above) was chosen by representatives of Hollins, RIDE Solutions, and the Arts Commission to be displayed this year.

Lucy Marcus, who is pursuing an M.F.A. in creative writing at Hollins, was selected through a competitive process by a panel of arts commission and community members as this year’s Writer By Bus. She will ride various buses throughout April and May to produce literary works about her experiences, the people she meets, and the neighborhoods she visits. Her chronicles can be followed on the Writer By Bus Facebook page. Marcus’ final works will appear on the RIDE Solutions webpage this fall.

“These are exciting opportunities for our students not only to be involved in promoting this vital public service, but also to see an example of how the arts can be used to draw attention and change perceptions about important issues in our community,” said Hollins President Pareena Lawrence.

Kevin Price, general manager of the Greater Roanoke Transit Company, added, “We hope to make the role of public transit more visible, and to make the experience of taking the bus more exciting.”

Lucy Marcus
Hollins graduate student and teaching fellow Lucy Marcus is this year’s Writer By Bus.

Lamb’s design (along with works from the City of Roanoke’s public arts collection that will be displayed on the exterior of two other Valley Metro buses) was officially unveiled at an event on the Hollins campus on April 18. “My intention with this project was to create an image that invokes memories and feelings that instill joy, transcending age, race, and cultural differences, as well as socioeconomic class inequalities. In short, something for everyone,” Lamb explained. “Initially when most of us think of dandelion seed ‘puffs,’ we can mentally scroll back to childhood and the hours spent stalking the yard for an intact ‘puff’ to blow in the wind. So simple and satisfying was this playful task, the thought of it produces a smile on most of our faces.”

Marcus, who was recognized with Lamb at the event, noted, “I feel very lucky to live here, where our city workers and elected officials who do the difficult and vital work of keeping the transit circulating also create such rich programming to integrate and support the arts. I look forward to riding and writing with my eyes and heart open.”

Learn more about this year’s Art By Bus and Writer By Bus programs in this Roanoke Times article.

Virginia’s Blue Ridge Trailsetter Series features the Art By Bus program in this segment on local art in the Roanoke Valley.