Hollins Theatre Presents Revival of “Goodnight Moon: The Magical Musical,” Oct. 19-26

The musical version of a beloved children’s story that has sold millions of copies around the world is coming back to Hollins University this fall.

Goodnight Moon: The Magical Musical returns to Hollins Theatre, October 19 – 26. Based on the 1945 book by Margaret Wise Brown, a member Hollins’ class of 1932, the tale of the bunny who won’t go to sleep was adapted for the stage by Chad Henry. It was first presented in 2011 as the inaugural production of the Hollins Legacy Series, which was created to reimagine the work of Hollins writers as plays, musicals, and original theatre pieces. Hollins Theatre featured a revival of Goodnight Moon in 2015.

“We are working to make this show a great tradition here in Roanoke and a wonderful gift from Hollins to the community,” says Ernie Zulia, director of the Hollins Theatre Institute. “Along with six public performances, we are scheduling four performances for schoolchildren and are expecting as many as 2,000 kids to arrive here on buses throughout the run of the show.”

Goodnight Moon comes to the stage with whimsical costumes designed by California designer Amanda Quivey, lighting by Hollins resident designer Ann Courtney, and scenery by Disney artist Ryan Wineinger. Zulia describes the stage set as “a wondrous room filled with toys and pictures that comes to life before your eyes. The kittens, the mittens, the red balloon, and the cow jumping over the moon are all there, along with a few surprises. Goodnight Moon really is for children of all ages – we are proud that thousands of people have already seen the show over the years, and now it’s here for a new generation to enjoy.”

Hollins Theatre’s Main Stage will host the public performances of Goodnight Moon: The Magical Musical on Saturday, October 19, at 11 a.m.; Sunday, October 20, at 2 p.m.; Thursday and Friday, October 24 and 25, at 7:30 p.m.; and Saturday, October 26, at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for children under 12. For ticket sales and more information, visit www.hollins.edu/theatre or call the Hollins Theatre Box Office at (540) 362-6517.


Hollins, Roanoke College Announce Perry F. Kendig Award Winners for 2019

Susan Jennings, Jimmy Ray Ward, and The Studio School have been honored with this year’s Perry F. Kendig Arts and Culture Awards.

Co-sponsored by Hollins University and Roanoke College, the Kendig Awards program recognizes exemplary individuals, businesses, and organizations in Virginia’s Blue Ridge Region (counties of Roanoke, Botetourt, and Franklin, the cities of Roanoke and Salem, and the town of Vinton) that support excellence in the arts.

This year’s awards were presented during a ceremony at Roanoke College’s Olin Hall on September 24, hosted by Roanoke College President Michael C. Maxey and Hollins University Interim President Nancy Oliver Gray.

Jennings recently retired as the Arts and Culture Coordinator for the City of Roanoke and formerly was executive director of The Arts Council of the Blue Ridge. She continues to be an influential member on many advisory boards for the arts and a driving force behind the creation of initiatives such as Art for Everyone, Parks and Arts, and the Elmwood Park Restoration Project and Sculpture Garden. She played an instrumental part in the rebirth of downtown Roanoke through Center in the Square and the Taubman Museum of Art.

Ward has designed sets and exhibits for roughly 160 productions in 15 locations, and also teaches Radford University students to discover their unique talents. He is respected in the artistic community for his devotion to his craft; he is considered an exemplary collaborator and problem-solver, and has been brought back time and again by many organizations. From historical to whimsical, he has the impressive ability to convince an audience and is considered an “unsung MVP” for theatrical productions.

For 28 years, The Studio School has been a pioneer in arts education for the community.  It offers art classes in all media to students from beginners to professionals. Teachers are recognized artists both locally and nationally, and their skills draw students far and wide to attend individual and/or group classes. The Studio School also provides affordable opportunities to study abroad and to experience intensive sessions with visiting artists.

Named for the late Perry F. Kendig, who served as president of Roanoke College and was an avid supporter and patron of the arts, the Kendig Awards program was established in 1985 and presented annually by the Arts Council of the Blue Ridge through 2012. Hollins and Roanoke College first partnered the following year to bestow the honors. The institutions congratulate the 2019 winners.


Hollins, North Cross School Collaborate to Enhance Teachers’ Skills

Through a new partnership with Hollins University, teachers from Roanoke’s North Cross School are taking a significant step forward in growing their skills for the benefit of their students, their school, and their careers.

Beginning this fall, North Cross is providing for eight of their faculty members to earn a graduate degree at Hollins as part of their professional development. The teachers will all be working toward completing a Master of Arts in Teaching and Learning (MATL) at the university.

“This collaboration is not only a unique benefit to our faculty, but will strengthen our academic experience for students,” said North Cross Head of School Christian Proctor. “We have faculty from all areas of studies represented in this first group, so, ultimately, we will become more consistent in our academic approach across divisions and disciplines.”

The MATL at Hollins is designed for PreK-12 teachers who want to learn more about the practice of teaching; acquire and develop new knowledge; develop curricula in collaborative teams; and assume leadership roles within a school and/or school system.

“The teachers will be taking two classes each semester,” explained Lorraine Lange, director of the MATL as well as Hollins’ Master of Arts in Teaching and Master of Arts in Liberal Studies programs. “We anticipate their graduation in about two years.”

Students in the coed MATL program must complete six core courses online. Three program electives are also required, and as part of its partnership with North Cross, Hollins is customizing those electives and offering them to the eight teachers through face-to-face instruction. In lieu of a graduate thesis, the North Cross teachers will design an instructional classroom project intended to benefit their students.

“Students in the program have the opportunity to work with accomplished faculty in the areas essential in today’s continually changing landscape of PreK-12 education: writing, inquiry, instructional design, assessment, leadership, technology, and contemporary issues in education,” Lange stated. “Faculty members encourage collaborative efforts and provide opportunities for students, experienced teachers themselves, to learn from one another.”

To learn more about the MATL or the other coed graduate programs at Hollins, email hugrad@hollins.edu or call 540-362-6575.


Hollins, Roanoke College Announce Perry F. Kendig Award Nominees

Artists, arts advocates, and arts and cultural organizations are among the nominees for the 2019 Perry F. Kendig Arts and Culture Awards.

Co-sponsored by Hollins University and Roanoke College, the Kendig Awards program recognizes exemplary individuals, businesses, and organizations in Virginia’s Blue Ridge Region (counties of Roanoke, Botetourt and Franklin, the cities of Roanoke and Salem, and the town of Vinton) that support excellence in the arts.

This year’s winners will be announced at a special awards ceremony to be held at Roanoke College’s Olin Hall on Tuesday, September 24, at 5:30 p.m. If you are interested in attending this event, please RSVP to kendigawards@roanoke.edu by Tuesday, September 10.

Here are the nominees for the 2019 Kendig Awards:

  • Harvester Performance Center
    Since its opening in 2014, the Harvester has been a key promoter of economic development through the arts in Rocky Mount and Franklin County. The venue hosts 180-200 shows annually and visitors have come from all 50 states as well as 23 countries. In addition to showcasing a diverse array of entertainers, ranging from acclaimed musicians and comedians to up-and-coming talent, the Harvester has attracted new restaurants, lodging, and other business creation and expansion.
  • Susan Jennings
    Jennings recently retired as the Arts and Culture Coordinator for the City of Roanoke and formerly was executive director of The Arts Council of the Blue Ridge. She continues to be an influential member on many advisory boards for the arts and a driving force behind the creation of initiatives such as Art for Everyone, Parks and Arts, and the Elmwood Park Restoration Project and Sculpture Garden. She played an instrumental part in the rebirth of downtown Roanoke through Center in the Square and the Taubman Museum of Art.
  • Yvonne Olson
    Olson worked for The Arts Council of the Blue Ridge for 10 years and has generously volunteered over 2,000 hours of her time at the Taubman Museum of Art, where she also manages the newsletter Volunteer Voices. She has been integral to the success of such popular events as the Sidewalk Art Show and the CANstruction project.
  • RIDE Solutions
    A promoter of sustainable travel, RIDE Solutions has partnered with the Roanoke Arts Commission, the Art Mural Project, and other organizations to integrate art into the community of transportation. The Art by Bus program and Starline Performance Series, where art, music, and literature are implemented into travel with rolling galleries and concerts, are only two of the many projects they have initiated.
  • The Studio School
    For 28 years, The Studio School has been a pioneer in arts education for the community. It offers art classes in all media to students from beginners to professionals. Teachers are recognized artists both locally and nationally, and their skills draw students far and wide to attend individual and/or group classes. The Studio School also provides affordable opportunities to study abroad and to experience intensive sessions with visiting artists.
  • Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine
    VTCSOM places a priority on integrating arts and culture into the medical school experience. The focus of the school’s Creativity in Health Education program is to recognize the power or art in healing and recovery and teach students about the profound connection between art and medicine. Mini-Med Schools bring together these two disciplines with activities such as art shows and poetry contests. VTCSOM also presents art exhibitions in its hallways to reflect themes of healing.
  • Jimmy Ray Ward
    Ward has designed sets and exhibits for roughly 160 productions in 15 locations, and also teaches Radford University students to discover their unique talents. He is respected in the artistic community for his devotion to his craft; he is considered an exemplary collaborator and problem-solver, and has been brought back time and again by many organizations. From historical to whimsical, he has the impressive ability to convince an audience and is considered an “unsung MVP” for theatrical productions. 

Named for the late Perry F. Kendig, who served as president of Roanoke College and was an avid supporter and patron of the arts, the Kendig Awards were established in 1985 and presented annually by the Arts Council of the Blue Ridge through 2012. Hollins University and Roanoke College first partnered the following year to bestow the honors, and congratulates the 2019 slate of distinguished nominees.

For more information about the Kendig Awards, visit https://kendig.press.hollins.edu/.


Hollins Partners With City of Roanoke For Art By Bus, Writer By Bus Programs

Hollins is helping promote the value of public transportation to the Roanoke Valley by bringing visual arts and inspired writing onto the area’s bus network.

The university has joined RIDE Solutions, the Roanoke Arts Commission, and the Greater Roanoke Transit Company in presenting the annual Art By Bus and Writer By Bus programs, which this year showcase the talents of Hollins undergraduate and graduate students.

JM Lamb
Horizon student JM Lamb, whose design, “Wishes,” was selected for the fifth annual Art By Bus Program.

Associate Professor of Art Jennifer Printz led one of her classes in creating a series of original works, one of which would be selected to be installed on an entire half of a Valley Metro bus. “Wishes” by Horizon student JM Lamb (pictured above) was chosen by representatives of Hollins, RIDE Solutions, and the Arts Commission to be displayed this year.

Lucy Marcus, who is pursuing an M.F.A. in creative writing at Hollins, was selected through a competitive process by a panel of arts commission and community members as this year’s Writer By Bus. She will ride various buses throughout April and May to produce literary works about her experiences, the people she meets, and the neighborhoods she visits. Her chronicles can be followed on the Writer By Bus Facebook page. Marcus’ final works will appear on the RIDE Solutions webpage this fall.

“These are exciting opportunities for our students not only to be involved in promoting this vital public service, but also to see an example of how the arts can be used to draw attention and change perceptions about important issues in our community,” said Hollins President Pareena Lawrence.

Kevin Price, general manager of the Greater Roanoke Transit Company, added, “We hope to make the role of public transit more visible, and to make the experience of taking the bus more exciting.”

Lucy Marcus
Hollins graduate student and teaching fellow Lucy Marcus is this year’s Writer By Bus.

Lamb’s design (along with works from the City of Roanoke’s public arts collection that will be displayed on the exterior of two other Valley Metro buses) was officially unveiled at an event on the Hollins campus on April 18. “My intention with this project was to create an image that invokes memories and feelings that instill joy, transcending age, race, and cultural differences, as well as socioeconomic class inequalities. In short, something for everyone,” Lamb explained. “Initially when most of us think of dandelion seed ‘puffs,’ we can mentally scroll back to childhood and the hours spent stalking the yard for an intact ‘puff’ to blow in the wind. So simple and satisfying was this playful task, the thought of it produces a smile on most of our faces.”

Marcus, who was recognized with Lamb at the event, noted, “I feel very lucky to live here, where our city workers and elected officials who do the difficult and vital work of keeping the transit circulating also create such rich programming to integrate and support the arts. I look forward to riding and writing with my eyes and heart open.”

Learn more about this year’s Art By Bus and Writer By Bus programs in this Roanoke Times article.

Virginia’s Blue Ridge Trailsetter Series features the Art By Bus program in this segment on local art in the Roanoke Valley.

 


Hollins Honors Earth Day, Arbor Day with Free Tree Seedlings

UPDATE (04/15/2019): We’re pleased to announce that all the available tree seedlings have been claimed. Thanks to the campus community for your enthusiastic response!

The Hollins Tree Committee is celebrating Earth Day (April 22) and National Arbor Day (April 26) by giving away free tree seedlings this month to members of the campus community.

“The tree committee has sponsored numerous tree plantings on campus, most recently on March 18 along Carvin Creek during our annual Hollins Tree Planting Day,” said Assistant Professor of Biology Elizabeth Gleim, who serves as the faculty representative on the Tree Committee. “Now we’re hoping to make an impact beyond our campus.”

The seedlings are available to any faculty member, staff member, or commuter student who has a place to plant a tree. Nine different tree species are available through April 18, or while supplies last: red maple, silver maple, bald cypress, river birch, persimmon, black walnut, black cherry, silky dogwood (a shrub), and red osier dogwood (also a shrub). The seedlings are approximately one to two feet in length.

Members of the campus community can contact Gleim at egleim@hollins.edu to arrange a time for pick-up. There is a limit of two seedlings per individual.

 

Photo: Approximately 40 students, faculty, staff, and their family members took part in the annual Hollins Tree Planting Day in March. The group planted 90 seedlings along Carvin Creek on the Hollins campus. The work was an effort to mitigate the loss of the nearly 100 ash trees along the creek that are dying due to infestation by the emerald ash borer. The trees planted are all native to Virginia and well-adapted to the soggy soil along the creek, and include river birch, silver maple, and silky dogwood.

 

 


Hollins, Virginia Western Announce Guaranteed Admission Agreements

Hollins University and Virginia Western Community College have established Guaranteed Admission Agreements (GAA) for graduates of four Associate of Science programs from Virginia Western.

Students who obtain a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 in academically transferable courses and complete all requirements for Associate of Science degrees in business administration, general studies, social sciences, or social sciences – education, are guaranteed admission to Hollins.

“Hollins and Virginia Western recognize the need to partner and facilitate the path for women who seek to earn a four-year college degree and transfer their credits seamlessly into the Hollins curriculum and degree programs,” said Hollins President Pareena Lawrence. “Our GAAs will empower more students to continue their undergraduate education at an institution that prepares women to succeed in all sectors of society with an emphasis on leadership, life skills, and professional development.”

Lawrence noted that Guaranteed Admission Agreements students who enroll at Hollins will enjoy a number of benefits. “They are eligible for admission to competitive programs, financial aid, scholarships, parking, housing, and all other student services just as any other Hollins student. And, GAA students with a minimum of 58 credits will be given junior status and can enroll directly into 200 level courses or higher at Hollins.”

At a signing ceremony on Friday at Virginia Western, President Robert H. Sandel shared his excitement regarding the new agreements with a group of students. “Hollins is an outstanding university and has always been a wonderful partner for Virginia Western. These new agreements will give our students another pathway to seamlessly transfer and continue their education in pursuit of a strong career,” he said.

All of the courses that are accepted by Hollins will be applied towards the student’s baccalaureate degree and major program. A minimum grade of “C” must be obtained in each course the student wishes to transfer. GAA students can expect to graduate from Hollins with a baccalaureate degree after the successful completion of a minimum of 64 credits, two four-credit Short Term activities (classes, trips, independent study, or internships), and two physical education courses.

Moving forward, Lawrence said Hollins will provide up-to-date information to GAA students at Virginia Western pertaining to transfer procedures, financial assistance, housing policies, tuition and fee payments, and deadlines. Hollins will also develop a GAA guide for use by counselors, faculty, and students at Virginia Western.

Hollins is an independent liberal arts university offering undergraduate education for women, selected graduate programs for men and women, and community outreach initiatives. Founded in 1842, Hollins features nationally recognized programs in creative writing and theatre, extensive internship and study abroad opportunities, and a dedicated alumnae network.

Virginia Western Community College is a forward-thinking community college inspiring individual, community, and economic transformation. It provides quality educational opportunities that empower students for success and strengthen communities. The college provides credit based academic programs and non-credit workforce training along with distance learning online and dual enrollment courses in area high schools. To learn more, visit www.virginiawestern.edu.

Photo: Flanked by Virginia Western Community College students, Virginia Western President Robert Sandel and Hollins President Pareena Lawrence sign the Guaranteed Admission Agreements between the two institutions. 


VTCSOM’s “The Influence of Women” Exhibition Showcases Hollins Artists

Works by Hollins University students highlight a new exhibition that explores and celebrates the many ways women affect their worlds.

Students in Associate Professor of Art Jennifer Printz’s Intaglio Printmaking class have contributed their creativity to “The Influence of Women,” which is on display at the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine (VTCSOM) through March 1, 2019.

“Each student produced two amazing prints about women who have influenced them from friends, to family, to fictional heroines,” Printz explains.

The focus of the show was developed in appreciation for VTCSOM’s founding dean, Cynda Johnson, who is retiring at the end of this year.

Sponsored by VTCSOM’s Creativity in Healthcare Education program, “The Influence of Women” is one of three exhibitions held annually for local artists to showcase their works to the community and to reinforce to medical students the importance of having a community connection.

VTCSOM is located at 2 Riverside Circle in Roanoke.

 

Image: Rachel Jackson Hikaru, dry-point print with watercolor, 2018.


Submission Deadline for 2019 Margaret Wise Brown Prize Is Jan. 15

Publishers of picture books released in 2018 are invited to have their works considered for the 2019 Margaret Wise Brown Prize in Children’s Literature. The deadline for submissions is January 15, 2019.

Presented annually, the Margaret Wise Brown Prize recognizes the author of the best text for a picture book published during the previous year. The award is a tribute to one of Hollins University’s best-known alumnae and one of America’s most beloved children’s authors. Winners are given a $1,000 cash prize, which comes from an endowed fund created by James Rockefeller, Brown’s fiancé at the time of her death. Each recipient will also receive an engraved bronze medal as well as an invitation to accept the award and present a reading on campus during the summer session of Hollins’ graduate programs in children’s literature.

Judges for the 2019 prize include:

  • Elaine Magliaro, author of the 2018 Margaret Wise Brown Prize-winning book Things to Do.
  • Laura Kvasnosky, author of Little Wolf’s First Howling, the 2018 Margaret Wise Brown Prize Honor Book.
  • B. Lewis, a five-time Coretta Scott King Award-winning illustrator of over 70 books for children.

The publisher should submit four copies of each book they wish to nominate for the Margaret Wise Brown Prize: one copy to Hollins University and one copy to each of the three judges. Books must have been first published in 2018; reprints are not eligible. The winner will be announced in May 2019.

Please contact Lisa Rowe Fraustino at fraustinolr@hollins.edu for the judges’ addresses and further submission instructions.

The study of children’s literature as a scholarly experience was initiated at Hollins in 1973; in 1992, the graduate program in children’s literature was founded. Today, Hollins offers summer M.A. and M.F.A. programs exclusively in the study and writing of children’s literature, an M.F.A. in children’s book writing and illustrating, and a graduate-level certificate in children’s book illustration.

 


Hollins Connections Highlight Special Stage Event at Mill Mt. Theatre

Roanoke’s Mill Mountain Theatre (MMT) is paying tribute to a member of the Hollins University graduate program faculty by staging one of her acclaimed works for a special fundraising event.

On Saturday, November 10, MMT is presenting the play A Simple Gift by Nancy Ruth Patterson, who teaches in Hollins’ M.F.A. program in children’s book writing and illustrating and is celebrated for her creativity and devotion to her community. The goal of the fundraiser is to supplement generous grants from the Fishburn Foundation and the Helen S. and Charles G. Patterson, Jr. Charitable Foundation Trust to renovate MMT’s Waldron Stage into a “green space” venue. Tickets are $100 per person and can only be purchased in advance by contacting events@millmountain.org. A portion of the ticket price will be a tax-exempt charitable gift to MMT.

A Simple Gift earned recognition as “A love song to the theatre…a love song to life” when it was first produced at MMT nearly a decade ago. The play is the story of two former residents of fictional Brownsville, North Carolina – one who found fame on Broadway and the other who became a children’s writer – who accept an invitation from an old teacher to return to their hometown to put on a performance as a gift to the place that raised them both.

Hollins President Emerita Nancy Gray is among the prominent Roanoke citizens who will be appearing in the play alongside some of MMT’s top veteran actors and several young local actors who are starting their careers.

The one-night-only performance of A Simple Gift will be preceded by a supper of favorites from Chanticleer Catering and an open bar beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the Atrium of Center in the Square.