Hollins to Host 17th Annual Ethics Bowl, Jan. 31 – Feb. 1

The statewide collegiate Wells Fargo Ethics Bowl is coming to Hollins University for its 17th annual competition.

Co-sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for Independent Colleges (VFIC), the two-day event takes place January 31 – February 1. Student teams from Virginia’s leading independent colleges and universities will participate and debate a variety of case studies highlighting potential ethical dilemmas faced by citizens. The theme of the 2016 Wells Fargo Ethics Bowl is “Ethics and Civic Responsibility.”

Teams of three to five students from 15 VFIC schools will be paired in head-to-head competition that will be judged by panels of distinguished leaders from across Virginia and Maryland. Many notables from the business sector, law, education, finance, journalism, and other fields will listen and offer reaction to team and student presentations.

The Ethics Bowl kicks off with an opening session on Sunday, January 31, at 2:30 p.m. in Hollins’ Babcock Auditorium. The first matches begin at 3:30 p.m. in various locations throughout Moody Student Center and Dana Science Building. On Monday, February 1, rounds three and four start at 8:45 a.m. The final round of competition takes place at 11:15 a.m. in Babcock Auditorium. The public is invited to attend these sessions free of charge. The winner of the 2016 Wells Fargo Ethics Bowl will be announced on Monday at 12:30 p.m.

As the host institution, Hollins will have two teams competing in this year’s event:

Team 1
Lauren Earley ’16
Erin Harrover ’19
Lisa Sekwababe ’19
Audrey Spangler ’19

Team 2
Darcy Brauchler ’19
Julia Brooks ’19
Valerie Heflin ’19
Madchen Specht ’16

The faculty coordinator for both teams is Associate Professor of Philosophy Michael Gettings.

Founded in 1952, the VFIC is a nonprofit fundraising partnership supporting the programs and students of Bridgewater College, Emory & Henry College, Hampden-Sydney College, Hollins University, Lynchburg College, Mary Baldwin College, Marymount University, Randolph College, Randolph-Macon College, Roanoke College, Shenandoah University, Sweet Briar College, University of Richmond, Virginia Wesleyan College, and Washington and Lee University.


Expert on Middle East to Keynote Model Arab League Conference

James Phillips, Senior Research Fellow for Middle Eastern Affairs at The Heritage Foundation, will deliver the keynote address at the Appalachia Regional Model Arab League (ARMAL) conference, which will be held November 6 – 8 at Hollins University.

Phillips will speak at the Opening Plenary session on Friday, November 6, at 5:30 p.m. in Hollins’ Dana Science Building. His appearance is made possible by a grant from the Charles Koch Foundation.

Hollins Professor of Political Science Ed Lynch, coordinator for this year’s ARMAL conference, said Phillips is one of Washington’s foremost experts on the Middle East and the author of dozens of papers and hundreds of op-eds and blog posts on the Arabic-speaking world.

“Phillips will speak about the failure of socialism in the Arab world, and make suggestions for dealing with the aftermath of the Arab Spring. He’ll provide a fascinating perspective on the region for the delegates,” Lynch said.

Model Arab League is the flagship student leadership development program sponsored by the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations (NCUSAR). ARMAL brings together college and high school students from the Appalachia Region to learn firsthand what it is like to put themselves in the shoes of real-life Arab diplomats and other foreign affairs practitioners. Students act as representatives from Arabic-speaking countries ranging from Morocco to Iraq. At this year’s conference, they will discuss political, economic, social, and environmental issues, as well as the future of the Palestinian people and the vital matter of relations with the State of Israel.

In addition to Hollins, students from Converse College, Fairmont State University, Jacksonville State University, and Washington and Jefferson College are participating, as are local students from Roanoke Catholic High School and William Byrd High School.

ARMAL is one of 22 Model Arab League conferences sponsored each year by NCUSAR. The conference opening session is free and open to the public.


Hollins to Co-Host Virginia Women’s Conference on Nov. 21

Hollins University is joining U.S. Senator Mark Warner, Virginia Tech, the Roanoke Valley Convention and Visitors Bureau, and the City of Roanoke in hosting the 2015 Virginia Women’s Conference on Saturday, November 21, from 8 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at The Hotel Roanoke & Conference Center.

Admission is free but registration is required.

The theme of this year’s conference is “Leadership and Lifelong Learning.” The agenda features a variety of breakout sessions, including:

  • From Conflict to Curiosity: Leadership Lessons Applied to Real Life
  • Women & Digital Domination
  • The Myth and the Math: Capital in the Community for Women-Owned Businesses
  • Prepare to Care – Physically, Mentally and Financially
  • Your Health: Ages & Stages
  • Leadership: From Fear to Fun
  • Four Keys to More Effective Leadership Behaviors
  • The Power of Friendship
  • The Modern Home Front
  • What’s Your EQ (Emotional Intelligence)?
  • The Woman in Charge: Financial Empowerment
  • Managing Stress with Success
  • Women as Agents of Change

Also highlighting the conference will be remarks from Senator Warner; a keynote address by Rynthia Rost, vice president of public affairs at GEICO; and a speed networking lounge. Joy Sutton, host of The Joy Sutton Show, is the emcee.

To register or learn more about this year’s Virginia Women’s Conference, visit www.warner.senate.gov/womensconference.

 

 


Hollins to Participate in Virginia Private College Week

Hollins University is one of 24 independent colleges and universities welcoming prospective students during Virginia Private College Week, July 27 – August 1.

The event is sponsored by the Council of Independent Colleges in Virginia (CICV).

Along with the other participating institutions, Hollins will offer campus tours and information sessions about admission, financial aid, and academic programs. University officials will also address some common myths about the cost of a private college education.

Students who visit at least three institutions during the week will receive three application fee waivers. Students may use these waivers to apply to any three participating CICV colleges for free.

“Visiting campuses in person is one of the most important steps in the college search process,” said CICV President Robert Lambeth. “I encourage parents to explore which college will be the best fit for their son or daughter, and I want to reassure them that a quality education at a Virginia private college is affordable and within reach.”

Sessions at Hollins will begin at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m., Monday through Friday, July 27 – 31, and at 9 a.m. on Saturday, August 1. Students and families may register by calling Hollins’ Office of Admission at 800-456-9595.


“This Is Your Moment in Time”: Hollins Celebrates the Class of 2015 at Its 173rd Commencement

Hollins’ class of 2015 was encouraged to “live purposefully, live authentically, live courageously, live passionately, and live compassionately” during the university’s 173rd Commencement Exercises on Sunday, May 24.

A total of 218 Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Master of Fine Arts, and Master of Arts degrees were conferred during the morning ceremony on Hollins’ historic Front Quadrangle.

A photo album with highlights of this year’s commencement ceremony can be viewed here

The Rev. Dr. Cynthia Hale, a member of Hollins’ class of 1975 and founding and senior pastor of the 5,000-member Ray of Hope Christian Church in Decatur, Georgia, was this year’s guest speaker. Considered one of America’s most dynamic pastors, Hale told the graduates, “You are among the brightest and best minds in the world. You are gifted beyond measure, graced with unlimited potential and possibility. The sky is the limit for what you can be and what you can do.

“You sit poised for the next phase of your life, excited but no doubt a little anxious about leaving the place you’ve called home for the last four years. You are wondering if you are ready for the world. The question is not, are you ready for the world, but is the world ready for you?

“You are prepared to handle whatever challenges come your way as you take your rightful place in the world as Hollins women. [But] the world still struggles to be an equitable place in providing the same opportunities for women that it affords to men.

“My sisters, this is your cue. This is your moment in time. There’s a world out there that desperately needs you, your gifts, your knowledge, your creativity, your voice.”

Hale offered five principles to guide graduates whatever path they choose to take in life:

  • “Focus your strength, time, and energy. What are the essential things you need to be doing? Get rid of all distractions. A purposeful woman is a confident woman.”
  • “Be your true self. Women, one of our greatest challenges is to believe in ourselves. Where you go is really up to you. It’s all about what lies within.”
  •  “Be courageous. Some folks think courage is the absence of fear. But, it’s the ability to press on in spite of your fear.”
  • “Passion is the key to success. Loving what you do will cause you to work hard to make it happen. Passion increases willpower when you get discouraged or tired. It makes the impossible possible.”
  • “Value each person and treat them with dignity and respect.”

Following Hale’s remarks, Thomas Barron, chair of the Hollins University Board of Trustees, presented her the degree of Doctor of Laws honoris causa in recognition of her distinguished career in the ministry.

Hale’s address may be viewed in its entirety here.

Other honors presented at this year’s commencement included:

Faculty Awards for Academic Excellence

Given by the faculty, these awards recognize the students with the highest academic standings in the class of 2015. This year’s recipients are chemistry major Adeiye Ayodele Pilgrim (highest standing) and economics major Thao Thanh Nguyen (second highest standing).

Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award

Given by the New York Southern Society in memory of the founder, this award recognizes a senior who has shown by daily living those qualities that show love and helpfulness to other men and women. Chanice Holmes, a dance major, is this year’s honoree.

Annie Terrill Bushnell Award

Presented to the senior who has evidenced the finest spirit of leadership during her days at Hollins, this award was established by the late Mrs. William A. Anderson in memory of her mother. This year’s awardee is film major and Student Government Association President Georden West.

Jane Cocke Funkhouser Award

Honoring an alumna of the class of 1911, this award recognizes the junior or senior who, in addition to being a good student, is preeminent in character and leadership. Molly Budd, a biology major, is this year’s recipient.

Hollins University Teaching Award

This annual award celebrates a member of the teaching profession who has dedicated his or her time and talent in preparing the nominating student for an outstanding liberal arts education. This award is endowed by Mary Bernhardt Wolfe Decker ’58. Sister Mary Brigid Burnham, English and Latin teacher at Saint John Paul the Great Catholic High School in Dumfries, Virginia, was presented this year’s award. She was nominated by English major Kathryn Sirks.

 


Jane Goodall Tells a Hollins Audience Why She Still Has Hope for Our Planet

She may have turned 81 earlier this month, but Jane Goodall still spends 300 days a year traveling the world on a mission to educate people of all ages about Earth’s environmental crises and the many threats to humans and animals alike.

“I’m finding young people who don’t have much hope for the future, who have become apathetic, depressed, and angry. They say, ‘You older generations have compromised our future and there’s nothing we can do about it.’

“Maybe its wishful thinking, some biologists will tell you it’s too late to change the way things are going, we just have to adapt to a world that’s getting worse and worse. But I think there’s a window of time where we can bring about change.”

The noted primatologist and conservationist brought her message of hope to Hollins University on April 20 and spoke before an audience that filled both the Hollins Theatre and duPont Chapel, where her address was simulcast. The event was sponsored by the university’s Distinguished Speakers Fund.

Goodall began her one-hour-and-twelve-minute address with captivating stories of growing up in London during World War II and her mother’s invaluable role in “the making of a little scientist: curiosity, deciding to find out for yourself, asking questions, learning patience. A different type of mother might have crushed that. I might not be standing here today. She supported my love of animals throughout my childhood, and she helped me find books about animals because she thought it would help me to learn quicker.”

Two books in particular had a profound impact on Goodall: Doctor Doolittle (“The first book I actually owned. I still have it. I pretended to my friends that I could actually understand the birds, the cats, the dogs. I interpreted their sounds.”) and Tarzan of the Apes, which “began my dream. I would grow up, go to Africa, live with animals, and write books about them. Everybody laughed at me – I was just a girl. Those careers, those adventures, were for boys. But my mother supported this dream. What she said to me is what I say to young people around the world, whether they are rich or poor, whichever country they live in: If you have a dream, she said, you must be prepared to work very hard. You must take advantage of opportunity. You must never give up.”

When she was 23, Goodall’s dream began coming to fruition. She got a job in Nairobi, Kenya, and subsequently met the famed anthropologist and paleontologist Louis Leakey. She impressed Leakey with her extensive knowledge of animals in Africa and convinced him she was the person he was seeking to live with and study the chimpanzee in what is now Tanzania. He secured funding to support six months of research, but as Goodall explained, there was another obstacle to overcome.

“Tanzania was still part of the British Empire, and British authorities were not prepared to give permission to this young girl to go out into this potentially dangerous forest with potentially dangerous animals. Nobody really knew anything about chimpanzees except they’re much stronger than us. Leakey never gave up and in the end the authorities said, ‘She can come, but she has to have a companion.’ Who came with me? That same amazing mother.”

At that time, it was widely thought that only humans made and used tools. Goodall’s observation that chimpanzees were also proficient with tools caught the attention of the National Geographic Society, which offered to continue funding her research. This set the stage for decades of ground-breaking work in studying chimpanzees’ complex social structure, research that earned her worldwide acclaim.

Goodall said she became an environmental activist after attending a conference in Chicago in the mid-80s with other chimpanzee researchers. “We had a session on conservation, which was shocking. All across Africa, chimpanzees were losing their habitats, their numbers were plummeting, forests were being destroyed. Since October 1986 I haven’t been more than three weeks consecutively in any one place.” She dedicated herself to “learning more and more about all these terrifying things we are doing to the planet. Many people don’t know. We don’t know the extent to which we are polluting this planet. We don’t know the extent to which industrial, agricultural, and household chemicals are being washed down into the streams and rivers and finally ending up in the oceans. We don’t realize the extent of human population growth.”

Even though she wonders, “How is it that the most intellectual creature that has ever walked on the planet is destroying its only home?”, Goodall offered five reasons why she still believes the challenges Earth faces can be addressed:

  • Roots & Shoots. This youth program, which Goodall launched in Tanzania in 1991, began with 12 students from nine different high schools. Today, Roots & Shoots is in 113 countries and consists of almost 100,000 groups encompassing pre-schoolers to university students. Their only mandate is to pursue projects that help people, animals, the environment, or any combination of the three. “From the beginning, Roots & Shoots groups have decided for themselves what to do,” Goodall explained. “These young people have the most amazing ideas. Once they know the problems and we empower them to take action, they roll up their sleeves and get out there. There are hundreds of problems in the world today, and all the places I go, there are groups of children wanting to solve them.”
  • The Human Brain. “We’ve done some pretty bad things with our brain, but we shouldn’t be in the mess we’re in. You know what we’re capable of doing,” Goodall said, citing breakthroughs in technology. “The problem, I think, is a disconnect between the human brain and the human heart. That can lead to serious problems. I truly believe that only when head and heart live in harmony can we reach our true human potential. And our potential is huge.”
  • Nature’s Resilience. “We can utterly destroy a place. But with a lot of hard work, it can be restored.” Goodall described the transformation that occurred in the region surrounding Tanzania’s Gombe Stream National Park. “The land around Gombe was bare hills. It was clear there were more people living there than the land could support. The land was over-farmed and infertile. The people were struggling to survive.” Fifteen years after introducing a community-centered conservation program, Goodall said those hills were green once again, and the chimpanzees native to the area had three times more forest for their habitat than when the project began.
  • Social Media. “I was in a climate march in New York last September with 400,000 people,” Goodall recalled. “Only 100,000 were expected. All around me were people with their iPads, iPhones. They were on Twitter and Facebook and they were telling their friends to come. And you could see them coming. Ten years ago, we might get a couple of hundred people coming to a march or demonstration or signing a petition. But now, you have hundreds of thousands by using social media. Of course it can be used for bad ends, but it’s also an incredibly powerful tool to make the world a better place, and it’s increasingly being used that way.”
  • “The Indomitable Human Spirit.” “You matter as an individual. You can make a difference. You can succeed even when it appears fate is against you,” Goodall implored. “Every single one of us in this room has this magical potential within us. We have to learn to let it free, let it fly, have faith in it, and not give up. When that starts to happen, the world will change.”

For more information about Goodall’s work and the Jane Goodall Institute, visit www.janegoodall.org.


Social Entrepreneur Nancy Lublin to Keynote 2015 Career Connection Conference

DoSomething.org CEO Nancy Lublin, named by Fortune magazine as one of the “World’s 50 Greatest Leaders,” will deliver the keynote address at Hollins University’s 2015 Career Connection Conference (C3) on October 19.

Lublin’s approach to business, teens, and technology has transcended the not-for-profit world. Under her leadership, DoSomething.org is currently among the largest youth organizations in America, leveraging Facebook, texting, and Twitter to engage more than 3.6 million teens in its campaigns. Considered an expert in digital marketing, youth culture, and change management, Lublin was named one of 2014’s Social Entrepreneurs of the Year by The Schwab Foundation, and Fast Company called her one of the “most creative people in business.”

Lublin is the author of  Zilch: The Power of Zero in Business and has been featured on Oprah, 60 Minutes, The Today Show, and CNN, and in People, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Economist.

Each fall, C3 brings Hollins students and alumnae together for an array of panels, workshops, presentations, and networking opportunities. Alumnae share how they translated their liberal arts education into satisfying careers and also provide tips, tools, and tricks of the trade to land that first job. Approximately 75 alumnae participated in the 2014 C3 event.


Hollins Students to Debate “Ethics and the Family” at 16th Annual Ethics Bowl

Hollins University will attempt to take home the Batten Trophy for the second consecutive year when it participates in the Virginia Foundation for Independent Colleges‘ 16th annual statewide collegiate Wells Fargo Ethics Bowl on February 8-9 at Marymount University in Arlington.

Students from Hollins will compete head-to-head against other highly qualified teams from Virginia’s leading independent colleges and universities, debating a variety of case studies highlighting ethical dilemmas. The theme of this year’s event is “Ethics and the Family.” Many notable personalities from business, law, education, finance, journalism, and other fields will listen to team presentations and offer reactions.

Members of the Hollins team this year include Kyrianne Lorenz ’15, Madchen Specht ’16, and Marisa Vitulli ’18. Associate Professor of Philosophy Michael Gettings is the team’s faculty coordinator.

The Ethics Bowl program will commence with an opening session on Sunday, February 8, at 2:30 p.m. in Marymount’s Rowley Hall. The first matches are scheduled to start at 3:30 p.m. Rounds three and four of the competition will begin at 8:45 a.m. on Monday, February 9, with the final round taking place at 11 a.m. in Reinsch Auditorium. The winning team will be announced at 12:15 p.m. on Monday.

The public is invited to attend the match sessions free of charge.

Hollins captured the title last year after defeating Bridgewater College in the Ethics Bowl final.

Founded in 1952, the Virginia Foundation for Independent Colleges is a nonprofit fundraising partnership supporting the programs and students of 15 leading independent colleges in the Commonwealth, including Bridgewater College, Emory & Henry College, Hampden-Sydney College, Hollins University, Lynchburg College, Mary Baldwin College, Marymount University, Randolph College, Randolph-Macon College, Roanoke College, Shenandoah University, Sweet Briar College, University of Richmond, Virginia Wesleyan College, and Washington & Lee University.


Hollins Partners with Other Local Colleges and Universities for “Selma” Screening

Hollins University is joining an effort led by Jefferson College of Health Sciences to bring together the communities from six Roanoke Valley higher education institutions and programs for a screening of the Academy Award® nominated film, Selma, on Tuesday, January 27.

Students, faculty, and staff from Jefferson College and Hollins as well as Ferrum College, Radford University’s DPT Program, Roanoke College, and the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine are participating in the screening, which will take place at Roanoke’s Grandin Theatre.

The purpose of the event is to promote discussions in and among local college communities about equal rights and the need to continue to build “the beloved community” espoused by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The screening of the film serves to bridge the schools’ observances and celebrations of King’s birthday and Black History Month in February.

To give the audience context for the film and the time period in which it took place, a prescreening discussion will kick off the event at 5 p.m. The film will begin at 5:25 p.m. Following the screening, the audience will be invited to the Grandin Colab for conversation and reflection.

Nominated for Best Picture and Best Original Song Oscars, Selma tells the true story of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s 1965 campaign to gain equal voting rights despite violent opposition. A march led by King from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, culminated in the Voting Rights Act of 1965, one of the civil rights movement’s most important and enduring accomplishments.